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Found 3616 courses
IDSEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Art and Politics in the City: New York and Buenos Aires

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course brings together students in New York and Buenos Aires to examine how urban arts and politics intersect in the Americas: How are art and politics understood and expressed differently and similarly in these two American metropolises and why? How do shared aesthetic features of public art in the city reflect the global circulation of urban creative modes? What do we learn about local politics from looking at the art and writing on a city’s public spaces? Teams of students in both cities will conduct field work in selected neighborhoods to help create an archive of murals, graffiti, performances, and installations. Then, drawing from readings in history, art criticism, and urban studies, as well as from census and electoral data and using GIS technology, we will analyze how social and political processes like gentrification, inequality, and planning generate and reflect creative political expression as captured in our database, culminating in transnational, collaborative projects that explore what the art and writing of city streets reveals about urban life in 21st century America.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1485 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Beyond Picture Perfect: Personal Choice in a Digital World

4 units Mon Tue Wed Thu
2:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Jeff Day

Description

This course covers the very basic techniques of photography and digital imaging. Beyond Picture Perfect explores the many choices available to today’s image makers. New technology combined with traditional photographic techniques will be addressed, enabling the students to realize their distinctive image-making vocabulary. Daily discussions include understanding hardware mechanics, choosing a personal color palette, and recognizing “your” unique composition key. We will debate the many analog and digital tools available to photographers vital to their artistic expression. These concepts will be supported by daily assignments and class critiques culminating in a final project portfolio. Students with interest in analog or digital formats will be encouraged to develop an understanding of their medium and form an original visual strategy. Museum/ gallery visits and field trips for on-location photographing will inspire students to create their own way of seeing. Readings may include selections from: Robert Adams,  Why People Photograph ; London and Upton,  Photography .

Notes

This course is for beginners only, covering the very basic techniques of photography and digital imaging.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1029 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Creating Drama from Character, in Collaboration with The New Group

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Ian Morgan

Description

For 20 years, renowned Off-Broadway theatre company The New Group has been premiering and producing character-driven, ensemble-based work. This course will immerse students in the company's approach, which emphasizes character and intimate, visceral ensemble work. Students will jointly develop new performance work through group improvisation and playwriting, while also studying multiple processes and theories of developing a new ensemble-based theatrical work for performance, taking playwright/director Mike Leigh's "improvised play" as a particular model. The course, led by Associate Artistic Director Ian Morgan, will feature master classes from New Group artists, including Artistic Director Scott Elliott.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1752 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

This Mediated Life: An Introduction to the Study of Mass Media

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Julian Cornell

Description

This interdisciplinary seminar will provide an intensive introduction to the study of mass media. Utilizing wide ranging critical and theoretical methodologies, the course will consider how media alternately reflects and forms our sense of politics, economics, race, gender, sexuality and citizenship. The course will be concerned with questions such as: What function does mass media serve for society? How does a media saturated cultural environment shape our identity? How do mass media forms delineate and naturalize prevailing ideologies and ways of being in the world? Can media provide a means to challenge cultural and political hegemony? Readings will be drawn from Berger’s Media Analysis Techniques as well as the anthologies The Media Studies Reader and Gender, Race and Class in the Media and the course will include excerpts from the films The Dark Knight Rises, The Matrix, The Truman Show, Network, Idiocracy and Catfish, television shows 60 Minutes, Family Guy, The Simpsons, South Park and The X-Files, as well as a selection of other media forms, including blogs, podcasts, radio programs, graphic novels, newspapers, magazines, music videos, social media sites and video games.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1542 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
WI 2017

Motown Matrix: Race, Gender and Class Identity in "The Sound of Young America"

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

In the 1960s Motown Records emerged as a dominant force in American popular music. Billing itself as “The Sound of Young America,” Motown established a lyrical and musical discourse through its records and albums that struck a responsive chord with white and black listeners alike. In this seminar we examine the race, gender and class identity that is inherent in—and emerges from—“The Motown Sound.” How did this company exploit the nationalist pride in the African American community while simultaneously positioning itself as a “crossover” enterprise to whites? What models of business and community did Motown emulate and create? And how did Motown affect the politics and racial discourse of its listeners? Our exploration situates Motown in the Detroit community of the 1950s and 1960s, to understand how it was “imagined,” and its impact on the wider culture. Readings may include excerpts from  The Origins of the Urban Crisis  by Thomas Sugrue;  One Nation Under a Groove  by Gerald Early;  Where Did Our Love Go?  by Nelson George;  American Odyssey  by Robert Conot;  Dancing in the Street  by Suzanne E. Smith;  Just My Soul Responding  by Brian Ward, and  Detroit: I Do Mind Dying  by Dan Georgakas and Marvin Surkin. The lyrics of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and Holland-Dozier-Holland as well as such films as  Standing in the Shadows of Motown  and  Dream Girls  may be included.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1698 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
EARLY
WI 2017

The Social Contract: Early Modern European Political Theory

4 units Tue Wed Thu Fri
2:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Justin Holt

Description

What holds a society together? This course will explore one influential answer to this foundational question within philosophy and social theory, namely social contract theory as it developed within early modern European political philosophy. Modern assumptions about the relationship between individual and society, private property and ownership, rationality, economics and the market, and rights and responsibilities of citizenship have all been shaped by social contract theory. But, even though this theory has enjoyed great influence, it has been severely criticized as unrealistic and biased towards individualism and property holders. We will read the foundational social contract works in this course and try to understand their assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses. The works to be read will include: Hobbes' De Cive, Locke's Two Treatises of Government, and Rousseau's The Social Contract.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1289 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Narrative Investigations II: Realism to Postmodernism

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Stacy Pies

Description

In this class we will continue to explore the concept of narrative and the way writers interrogate literary and social conventions. As we consider how stories shape our notions of history, love, social class, and sexual identity, we will examine how the thinking of readers, and stories, changed from the nineteenth century to the twentieth. We will follow the emergence of a new form of narration, whose protagonists include not only characters, but also time, place, the city, the reader, and language itself. We will read Flaubert’s  Madame Bovary , James Joyce's  Ulysses , as well as essays on film and narrative theory.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9501 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

SYDNEY: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-SYDNEY. This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by CAPA International (CAPA), an organization partnering with NYU. CAPA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1342 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Language, Globalization, and the Self

4 units Wed
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Maria-Luisa Achino-Loeb

Description

This course is intended as an exploration of language as vehicle for processes of globalization. What role did language play in the changes wrought by early capitalist transformations and the colonial expansion? Conversely, how have these global changes affected localized communities and the languages that identify them? And why should we care? To answer these questions we examine how the colonial experience has given rise to value-laden linguistic practices that mirror and sustain the racializing of privilege; and how the experience of language-loss encountered by voluntary and involuntary migrants can attack the integrity of the self. While ultimately concerned with language, our discussions have a wide scope ranging from issues of political economy to collective consciousness and individual psychology. Readings include Achino-Loeb's  Silence: The Currency of Power , Anderson's  Imagined Communities , Wolf's  Europe and the People Without History , Hoffman's  Lost in Translation , Richard Rodriguez’  Hunger of Memory  as well as selected excerpts from other sources.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1027 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Performing the Real: Solo and Alternative Performance

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Lenora Champagne

Description

This is a class in solo performance composition primarily for performers, dancers and for students interested in performance art and its histories. Participants develop a solo performance through a series of exercises using memory, movement and written and visual imagery, and explore the associative strategies of collage and pastiche as methodologies for structuring material. The solos emerge from a process involving improvisation (movement and text), composing, and revision of material. Readings include performance texts by prominent artists, essays on performance, and video viewings, which foreground the tendency in performance to explore subjectivity and identity in light of social and political critique. Required texts include Jo Bonney’s  Extreme Exposure , C. Carr's  On Edge: Performance at the End of the Twentieth Century , and Lenora Champagne’s  Out from Under: Texts by Women Performance Artists . Additional readings include Colin Counsell, "Postmodernism and Performance Art," Roselee Goldberg, "Performance: A Hidden History," Jonathan Kalb, "Documentary Solo Performance: The Politics of the Mirrored Self," and an essay by Coco Fusco. Assignments include a solo performance created from the material developed in class (rather than "polishing" an already created piece), along with a written analysis of two live solo performances, and an oral presentation. Strategies learned in this class are also useful for composing group work.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1811 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Desperate Housewives of the 19th-Century Novel

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
June Foley

Description

From Jeffrey Eugenides's novel The Marriage Plot to TV's Desperate Housewives and "Real Housewives" series, our contemporary culture explores what happens after "happily ever after." Some of the great novels of the mid-to-late 19th century also examine the dilemmas of wives during a period when every aspect of "The Woman Question," including divorce and child custody laws, was debated. In this course we explore controversial novels in which female characters struggle with lives largely limited by the cultural stereotypes of the Angel in the House and the emerging New Woman..Readings include Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary (1856), Kate Chopin's The Awakening (1899), and George Gissing’s The Odd Women (1893). We contextualize each with readings on historical events in the French, American, and English settings. We also read about the post-publication history of these works, including Flaubert’s trial for obscenity, Chopin’s supposedly abandoning novel-writing because of the controversy over her work, and Gissing’s own two disastrous marriages. Other readings include selections from J.S. Mill's The Subjection of Women, and from the theory of Thorstein Veblen and Michel Foucault. We end with an update: journalist Kate Bolick’s Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own (2015) which examines her life and those of five other unmarried women writers: Maeve Brennan, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Edith Wharton, Neith Boyce, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9600 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

WASHINGTON, DC: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-WASHINGTON. This 4-credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 20 hours fieldwork per week at an approved internship fieldsite. Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1785 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

U.S. Empire and the Global South: The Long 20th Century

4 units Tue
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Marie Cruz Soto, Paula Chakravartty

Description

This course will explore the makings of the U.S. Empire in the long 20th century through a closer look at its interactions with what has come to be termed “the Global South.” The main goals are to think critically about “empire” and “the global south” as dynamic categories of analysis, to explore debates about “American Exceptionalism,” and to examine how U.S. imperial power has been articulated and contested. The class will pursue these goals by focusing on four historical conjunctures that have brought together different regions of the world and that enable a better understanding of the political economy and cultural practices of the U.S. Empire. These conjunctures are the 1890s formal acquisition of colonies, the 1950s Cold War realignment, the 1980s debt crisis and counter-revolutions, and the contemporary War on Terror. Readings for this course may include: Greg Gradin’s  Empire’s Workshop , Laleh Khalili’s  Time in the Shadows,  Ann Stoler and Carole McGranahan’s  Imperial Formations,  Emily Rosenberg’s  Financial Missionaries to the World , Christina Duffy Burnett and Burke Marshall’s  Foreign in a Domestic Sense , Julian Go’s  American Empire and the Politics of Meaning , Edward Said’s  Covering Islam , Lila Abu-Lughod’s  Do Muslim Women Need Saving? , and Neferti Tadiyar’s  Things Fall Away. 

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1903 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Montaigne

2 units Wed
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Andrea Gadberry

Description

This class is a seven-week introduction to the thought of Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592). Nowadays, we encounter Montaigne’s work most frequently in aphoristic quotations like this one: “When I am playing with my cat, how do I know she is not playing with me?” Yet taken out of context, solitary citations conceal the complexity of Montaigne’s thought as well as that of the genre in which they appear, a genre, in f act, Montaigne is credited with having invented: the essay. This semester, we will read widely across the three volumes of Montaigne’s Essais and the diverse topics they consider, from lofty questions that grapple with the construction of the self, the question of experience, and the meaning of friendship and family to more banal topics like books, laziness, and, yes, thumbs. We will contextualize these writings by placing them in conversation with texts of other authors of the early modern period (Bacon, Browne, Burton, Castiglione, Columbus, de las Casas, Shakespeare, Sidney) as well as with more recent literary critical and critical theoretical texts.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 25; Last Class: March 8.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1509 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Adapting the British Hit for American Television

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
D.B. Gilles

Description

Adapting The British Hit For American TV will give students the opportunity to choose a current British show, comedy or drama, and adapt it into a Pilot script for an American television program. There’s a long history of British TV shows that made their way across the pond into the hearts of American audiences – and some that didn’t quite connect. Some of those that did: Til Death Do Us Part (All In The Family), House of Cards, The Office, The Thick of It (Veep) and Shameless. Some shows that misfired: Fawlty Towers (Amanda’s By The Sea), Free Agents, Coupling, Blackpool (Viva Laughlin) and Life On Mars. For the first few weeks, the class will view a number of British shows that succeeded and failed in America. Lectures and discussions will get into “Why” these shows worked or didn’t. Each student will then be given the chance to pick a British show, come up with storylines, an Outline and first draft of a script.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

INDIV-UG9550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

TEL AVIV: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1738 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Cultural Politics of Bad Taste

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Julian Cornell

Description

This seminar investigates the ideological, political and historical parameters of ‘taste’ in popular culture. Through examination of media artifacts that exemplify ‘trash,’ the course examines how ‘taste’ is constituted as a cultural category that reflects, produces and maintains the social structures of American society. What is meant by designations such as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ media, ‘high and ‘low’ art, ‘offensive’ or ‘artistic’ and who is empowered to make these distinctions? How do ‘bad objects’ reveal the ideological basis of ‘taste,’ and what is their relationship to ‘legitimate’ art forms? Does ‘trash’ pose a challenge to cultural standards of taste and ‘the mainstream?' What is the relationship between ‘bad’ art and spectatorship and why might audiences find ‘trash’ so enthralling? Readings are drawn from Bourdieu’s  Distinction , Glynn’s  Tabloid Culture , Ross’  No Respect , and the anthology  Trash Culture , while screenings include cult films such as  Mystery Science Theater 3000, Pink Flamingos, Plan 9 From Outer Space, South Park,  and  The Room , and a selection of reality TV programs, music and viral videos.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1440 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Technology, Art, and Public Space

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Terence Culver

Description

This course explores the relationship of art, technology, and public space through the study of historical and contemporary examples, and through our own direct experience of creating and installing a work of public art. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of recent technological developments on public art, but in turn, we use public art to reflect on emergent cultural and social transformations in New York City. The course focuses especially on the evolution of both Times Square and Union Square in New York City, to understand how art, commerce, politics, and public life have competed and converged to influence social and political change over the years. The experiential component of the course is a technology-based public art project (most likely involving large-scale digital media) that students plan and execute. Students keep a journal for the duration of the project, which is used to evaluate the project and to connect it to other coursework. Readings for the course are drawn from a number of sources, including: Gaston Bachelard,  The Poetics of Space;  Rosalyn Deutsche,  Evictions: Art and Spatial Politics ; Barbara Goldstein,  Public Art By The Book ; Dolores Hayden,  The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History ; Bruno Latour (Editor),  Making Things Public: Atmospheres of Democracy ; Malcolm Miles,  Art, Space, and the City: Public Art and Urban Futures ; Jacques Rancier,  The Future of the Image .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1856 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Politics, Ethics and Aesthetics of Photography

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
A.B. Huber

Description

The seminar begins with a critical history of photography, and a consideration of the technology’s advent as something of a misfit art, before focusing on its increasing use as an instrument of visual evidence. We turn then to a series of case histories, from the early use of photography as a forensic tool at 19th century crime scenes, to the counter-forensic visual reconstructions of contemporary drone strikes in Pakistan, or recent police violence against unarmed civilians of color in the US. In each instance we ask how photography shapes what becomes visible or legible as violence, and what kinds of suffering—and what modes of resistance—move different spectators affectively, ethically, and politically. The seminar will rely on key theoretical works on photography as well as more recent critical interventions that help us reckon the use of surveillance and its neoliberal logics (Cole, Farocki, Steyerl, Weizman). How might the ubiquity of cameras inure or blind us to photography’s work? The seminar seeks to help students better understand the complex linkages between perception and understanding, and how photographs, as the modern visual form par excellence, shape our sense of the political world and our place in it.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9200 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

FLORENCE: History of Italian Fashion

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Students trace the birth, evolution, decline, revival, and most recent developments of Italian fashion from the Late Gothic Age to the present "made in Italy" design. Italian fashion styles are decoded in relation to art history in an international, social and economic context. Fashion and its connections with culture, subculture, gender and communication are emphasized. On-site visits also illustrate the dominating role of Florence in fashion from its origin until now. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

PRACT-UG1301 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Practicum in Fashion Business

4 units Tue
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Tracy Gardner, Lise Friedman

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/fashion-practicum.html Description: The fashion industry’s need to balance the conflicting demands of specialization and globalization requires innovative approaches that connect creativity, design and business. This course considers the dialogue surrounding ways the fashion business can meet these demands by linking aesthetic goals to financial plans. The course is designed to provide students interested in the fashion industry with an opportunity to develop their understanding of various approaches to bridging the gap between design and business. The course will combine hands-on group projects and case studies with interdisciplinary readings in business and design history, consumerism, merchandising and the business of fashion. The course will be taught by the Guess Distinguished Visiting Professor in Fashion and Fashion Business, and by a member of the Gallatin faculty. Admission is by permission of the Visiting Professor.

Notes

Permission required. Application deadline: Monday, October 24th, 5:00 pm. For more information and to apply, please click on course title and then link to application.

Type

Practicum (PRACT-UG)

IDSEM-UG1457 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

The Odyssey: Estrangement and Homecoming

2 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Description

One of the two foundational epics of so-called Western Culture, the  Odyssey  features a wily hero whose journeys are extraordinary and whose longing for home is unbounded. The  Odyssey  offers a complex meditation on brotherhood, bestiality, sexuality, kinship, and power; it is the great epic of cross-cultural encounter, in all its seductive and violent aspects, as well as the great poem of marriage. An adventure in nostos (homecoming), the  Odyssey  shows us the pleasures and dangers of voyaging among strangers. Constantly exploring the boundaries between the civilized and the savage, the poem offers as well a political critique of many ancient institutions, not least the family, patriarchy, hospitality customs, and the band-of-brothers so central to epic ideology. And as a masterwork of narrative art, the  Odyssey  asks us to consider the relation of fiction to “truth.” We will explore these and other matters in the  Odyssey , and may make some concluding forays into contemporary re-workings of Odyssean themes and characters.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 25; Last Class: March 8.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1700 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Becoming "Global" in the Early Modern World

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Valerie Forman

Description

Over and over, we are told that the world we live in is becoming increasingly global, that all its parts are connected to one another; and goods, people, culture, and information can move from one place to another, seemingly without barriers. Yet how true are these claims? And how new are the phenomena these claims describe? Scholars have pointed to the middle of the sixteenth century as the moment when the economy became global, and the age of exploration and colonization began to connect many parts of the world to each other in a complex network that included and radically reimagined forms of cooperation, piracy, and slavery. This course will explore what kinds of global consciousness developed in the early modern period in negotiations with these transformations. Some of our central questions include: to what extent did early modern people begin to imagine and experience the world globally, that is, as an entity whose regions were interdependent? Which groups of people began to experience it globally? How were things, places, and persons, not seen before categorized or valued? What influence did global encounters have on ideas about gender, sexuality, class, religion, and citizenship and on social and economic practices? What new kinds of narratives about the world developed in relation to the challenges of participating in it? Finally, to what extent is globalization a “western” phenomenon or a sign of modernity? We will investigate a wide variety of primary works, including travel narratives, plays, poems, ethnography, film, engravings, and globes. We will also read secondary works by literary scholars, anthropologists, and historians of labor, the economy, and science. Many of these works also put the past and present in conversation with each other in compelling ways. While many of the primary works originate in “Europe” or the Americas, we will also study a range of works that challenge the Eurocentric view of globalization that was emerging and still dominates much of contemporary discourse of globalization.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721 006.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Introduction to Dramatic Writing: The Short Play

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Darrel Alejandro Holnes

Description

In this arts workshop we will learn the basics of playwriting by examining the work of Aristotle as well as plays by major writers including Anton Chekov, Oscar Wilde, and others. Our goal will be to develop and revise a short play through a variety of writing exercises and techniques and the study of plays in  24 Favorite One-Act Plays  and the  Best 10-Minute Plays of 2014 . This course will also feature guest lectures by a diverse group of working playwrights and theater professionals and the viewing of a Broadway and Off-Broadway show. Upon completing this course you will have a working body of short dramatic writing and learn how to submit your work to student and professional festivals and contests worldwide.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1644 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Art, Activism, and Beyond

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Amin Husain

Description

This workshop interrogates the relationship between art and activism by focusing on (1) the Occupy Wall Street movement; (2) the Gulf Labor Coalition and Global Ultra Luxury Faction (G.U.L.F.), the direct action wing of Gulf Labor Coalition; (3) the Direct Action Front for Palestine in NYC; and (4) the Black Lives Matter movement. These case studies, alongside course readings and discussions, will help us to situate contemporary art in a historical and political context—a moment of rupture that is informed by ongoing histories of racism, colonialism, and debt. We will then move on to question how this moment might inform our own art practice, interrogating how, as contemporary artists, we might produce art that does not simply add flair to political work, but that engages in a dialectical practice--moving between theory and research, as well as action and aesthetics--and that considers how practice and process might become the work itself. A major component of the course will be a project that students plan and execute during the semester. Choice of practice and medium will be open, but possibilities might include work that is performative, visual, or conceptual, employing photography and/or digital media, text, film, painting, or sculpture. Readings will include: Berardi,  After the Future ; Breton,  What is Surrealism? ; Caws,  Manifesto: A Century of Isms ; Cesaire and Kelly,  Discourse on Colonialism ; Hardt and Negri,  Declaration , and McKee,  Strike Art! Contemporary Art and the Post-Occupy Condition .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1603 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Modern Poetry and the Actual World

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Lisa Goldfarb

Description

Although lyric poetry is the art of language that we reserve for the expression of the emotional dimension of our human experience, lyric poets also importantly use the forms and conventions of their art to respond to the shape and substance of the world they inhabit; that is, the historical, political, and physical aspects of the world—the “actual world”—in which they live. This course has two principal aims: first, to help us to develop skills in the reading of lyric poetry, and, second, to consider the complex relation between lyric poetry and the actual world. In the first half of the class, we will study the forms and conventions of lyric poetry and work on developing our poetic sensibilities. In the second half, we will focus our attention on the relationship of modern poets to the concrete or actual world and focus our study on W.H. Auden and Wallace Stevens, two poets who address the pressing questions of their day, and the world they shared, in strikingly different ways. Yet, however different their approaches, both poets ponder questions of faith and secularity, consider heroism and loss in a century marked by war, and probe our human relationship to nature in answer to an increasingly industrialized and technological world. Readings will include texts that consider how to read lyric poetry (Hirsch, Vendler, Perloff), a representative selection of modern lyric poetry (Eliot, Pound, Valéry, Éluard, Apollinaire, Moore, H.D., Bishop, Hughes, Brooks, Rich), the works of Auden and Stevens (essays and poems), as well as the philosophical, historical and political narratives to which they refer and that inform their work (Freud, Nietzsche, William James, Santayana).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1507 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing About American Comedy

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Saul Austerlitz

Description

Writing about comedy is a treacherous affair, and one that raises numerous intractable questions: What is comedy? What path has it carved out for itself over the past century? And how do we write about it? This advanced writing course will survey the story of American comedy in all its multifarious formats—the sitcom, the film comedy, the stand-up act, the variety show— while also serving as a workshop for cultural criticism that goes deeper than the recap. Utilizing a combination of reading, viewing, live performances, and workshopping, this course will sharpen students’ skills as writers by exposing them to the wide range of American comedy from Charlie Chaplin to “Key & Peele,” with units on African-American comedy, women in comedy, political comedy, and self-aware comedy, among others. In this course, we will wrestle with the complexities of writing about comedy, including, but not limited to, the question of whether being funny about what’s funny is a faux pas or a necessity. Writing assignments will offer students the opportunity to learn about the craft of cultural criticism by attending a stand-up show and writing a review, writing about a work of comedy that makes you uncomfortable, and other prompts. Readings will include essays by Clive James, Emily Nussbaum, James Agee, Jonathan Rosenbaum, Wesley Morris, Roxane Gay, and others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ELEC-GG2675 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Vibrant Matters

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eugenia Kisin

Description

How does matter—generally thought of as the inert stuff of nature, acted upon or animated by humans—come to  matter  in the social, political, and ecological senses of the word? This seminar explores recent approaches to materiality across art, anthropology, feminist theory, and political ecology, an interdisciplinary constellation of scholarship often called the “new materialism.” Proceeding from political theorist Jane Bennett’s rendering of vibrancy as a thingly agency bound up with social justice, this course is an invitation to work critically with this formation in a transcultural way. We will interrogate the “newness” of the new materialism, situating its histories and genealogies in earlier phenomenological approaches to matter, while exploring its alternative lineages and contestations. Students will apply the new materialism’s diverse methodological tools for theorizing things and networks to their own practices and projects. Emphasizing graduate-level reading skills, our discussions will be based primarily on several recent book-length texts, which we will work to situate within the new materialism and within their authors’ own disciplinary lineages. In addition to Bennett’s  Vibrant Matter , these texts may include Bill Brown’s  Other Things,  Natasha Myers’  Rendering Life Molecular , Spyros Papapetros’s  On the Animation of the Inorganic , and Anna Tsing’s  The Mushroom at the End of the World .

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (eugenia.kisin@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1771 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Promise and Pitfalls of Markets

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Ngina Chiteji

Description

In his classic text, the Wealth of Nations, the Scottish economist and moral philosopher Adam Smith argued that the human propensity to "truck, barter and exchange" would naturally lead to socially optimal outcomes if people were left to trade freely, without any government interference in markets. This idea that a competitive market can lead to efficient outcomes is a central tenet of economic theory today. Moreover, the more general belief that markets know what's best is widely held throughout U.S. society. This course is designed to teach students about what economics has to offer to the analysis of markets and the ways that firms make decisions. It also will include analyses of market outcomes from scholars in disciplines outside economics,  and   some   discussion of firms' ethical obligations .  In its exploration of these topics, the course draws largely on disciplines such as economics, sociology, moral philosophy, and the law.  Readings may include texts such as the following: Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich,  Winner-Take-All Markets by Robert Frank, and The Globalization Paradox by Dani Rodrik .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1910 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Habits of Reading: Narrative and Genre in Europe and America

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Karen Hornick

Description

“Myth,” “novel,” “epic,” “thriller,” “romantic comedy”—why do people bother making these distinctions between types of narratives, and how do we make them? From defining self (“I’m a sci-fi geek”) to organizing society (“only kids read comic books”), genres help us make sense of what we read and perform artistic, social, personal, and commercial functions. In this class we will closely examine stories representing a wide range of Western genres--an ancient epic, fairy tales and folktales, a Shakespearean tragedy, a novel, a novella, a short story, one modern 3-act play (a comedy), television shows, a classic Hollywood film, an "art" film, a video game "narrative," a graphic novel, perhaps even narrative painting and photography. In addition to helping us consider genre in relation to authorial intention and reader response, our survey will enable us to address contemporary questions about readership, fan fiction, and interactivity. When and why do we find it necessary to classify our stories into categories, and who benefits? How do genres reflect and contribute to the cultures that produce them? How do media shape genre and vice verse? How has genre constrained and inspired European and American authors? How do narrative genres prompt distinctions between fiction and truth, affect taste judgements, and shape opinion?

Notes

Open to sophomores only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1564 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Advanced Poetry Writing

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Scott Hightower

Description

A workshop designed for serious poets, this class teaches students how to take their writing to another level both intellectually and artistically; depth of theme, imagination, and craft are discussed. Emphasis is placed on developing and strengthening one’s personal style and voice. Through workshopping, students further refine their critical abilities as poets and readers. The class includes exercises and readings. Submission of work will be discussed and encouraged.

Notes

Prerequisite WRTNG-UG 1560 or CRWRI-UA 817 or CRWRI-UA 830 or permission of instructor. Students may take Advanced Poetry Writing two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG1303 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing Nonfiction on Social Change

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Nancy Agabian

Description

In this course, we’ll examine nonfiction from times of conflict and crisis to help us write essays and critiques in which we witness, report, advocate, question, and/or desire change in our own era. To provide inspiration, we’ll read essays on 9/11 and its aftermath, Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter, and other issues. We'll read authors such as Michelle Alexander, Ta-Nehesi Coates, Edwidge Danticat, Joan Didion, Carolyn Forche, Roxane Gay, and Joshua Phillips, to study their use of formal tools such as narration, observation, analysis, reflection, and argument in exploring avenues of change in the world around them. How do writers bring a personal voice to writing a political essay? And how do reporters balance opinion and research to show the need for change? These questions are considered as you write 1) an essay centered on an issue that you care about, and 2) a report that you write from observation about a social or political movement. Finally, writing an argument or advocacy piece on a public debate allows you to incorporate many of the lessons from the semester. Revision is part of our process, guided by peer reviews.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1864 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Museums as Sites of Social Change

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
William Crow

Description

Although traditionally viewed as storage houses for the past, many museums today see themselves as active agents of change and social progress. Museums can act as conveners and catalysts to engage a wide range of issues, from political stances to social justice issues to environmental concerns. But what happens when museums move from a static, neutral stance of reflecting society, to one that actively asserts its views and initiates social progress? How can museums maintain the public’s trust and support while engaging with issues that may be charged, or even controversial? Through a range of case studies and guest experts, we will examine how museums are embracing their role as sites for social change.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1894 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Engaged Research

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Gianpaolo Baiocchi

Description

This course introduces students to community-based research, its fundamental tools, and the potentials and limitations of particular methodologies.This kind of research may draw on philosophy of science, feminist scholarship, and critical social sciences, but it is ultimately research based in communities and driven by the needs of those communities. As such, it may not always meet reigning scientific or scholarly standards, and is prone to criticisms of bias or particularism. At the same time, it has the potential be more salient and meaningful to community members and to advocates of social change. In this class, we will explore these tensions around community-based research, addressing questions like: Do its potentials outweigh its limits? And what are the best ways to determine community need and to conduct this kind of research as a response to that need? Much of the course time, however, will be dedicated to carrying out projects based with three community-based groups in the New York City area. By the middle of the semester, the course will have moved entirely out of the classroom and participants should be willing to travel to different locations in the city.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1546 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Content is Key: Editing Short Fiction

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Steven Rinehart

Description

This class explores the hard decision-making involved in fiction, and attempts to give the students tools for deciding which content belongs in a story and which needs to be put aside for later use, or discarded altogether. We look at ways to discover what the first and second drafts are about, and which parts of the story add to that idea and which detract. We also hold a traditional workshop, discussing student stories in a roundtable session.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1775 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Contemporary Visual Culture and the Politics of Images

4 units Thu
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Lauren Walsh

Description

In this course students learn to think about the reading and writing practices of contemporary visual culture. What does it mean to “read” an image? How are images used politically? Is what is “un-seen” as important as what is seen? Students tackle philosophical, ethical, and political questions, and are encouraged to pursue topics of individual interest for assigned papers and projects. We will ground our discussions in relevant theory and will explore all manner of visual genres, including the graphic novel form, film, magazine ads, and photography. In examining the politics of visual images, this course places special, extended emphasis on images in the context of war and humanitarian crises. Throughout, we will think about our own roles in contemporary visual culture; we are consumers, participators, and creators, and sometimes we have no power over images. What does this mean for us when considered through, for example, an ethical or aesthetic or humanitarian lens? Critical literature by Susan Sontag, Susie Linfield, Scott McCloud, and/or Marita Sturken, among others, will inform our discussions and deepen student writing. Our syllabus also incorporates journalistic accounts and conflict photography, and may include at least one piece by the writer and documentary filmmaker Errol Morris. Students will write reaction papers, longer essays, and have the option of a visual project.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1608 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Write! Shoot! Edit!

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Keith Miller

Description

In this arts workshop, the class will work collaboratively to conceive and execute a short film from start to finish. The class focuses on the language of film, storytelling and production as well as the needs for collaboration, multi-tasking and creative problem solving inherent in the filmmaking process. Each student will take on multiple roles in each phase of the production. The course will be broken up into three parts. The first section begins with a brainstorming session in which the themes and storylines of the movie are conceived. The script is then written, scenes workshopped and the group prepares to shoot. The second section is the shoot, with roles divided between camera, direction, acting, producing, art direction, and the rest. The final section is the edit and post-production. This will include score, sound design, titles and graphics. On the path to the final movie skills such as writing, acting, cinematography, producing, editing, title design, score, will all be utilized according the needs of the movie and the demands of the group.

Notes

Permission required. Please email Prof. Miller (keith2miller@gmail.com). Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: Tuesday, January 24; Last Class: Thursday, March 9.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

CORE-GG2403 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Master's Thesis II

2 units
5:30 PM - 6:15 PM

Description

Application: [http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/masters-thesis2.html Description: To pass this class, the student must submit and defend his or her thesis. In the first months of the semester, the student continues to work in collaboration with the adviser to complete the thesis paper or, in the case of artistic thesis students, the artwork as well as the related research essay and other required accompanying materials. All students are required to attend a a mandatory information session during the first week of classes. As prescribed by the online Thesis and Defense calendar, students must receive approval for all work from their adviser far enough in advance of the defense so that the other panelists will have at least four weeks to read and inspect the submission. For more details, please see the additional information about Master's Thesis II on the Gallatin website as well as the thesis and defense calendar and submission forms.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: CORE-GG 2402. Please note there are two components to this course: an independent study section with hours to be arranged between the student and faculty adviser and a mandatory information session meeting during the first week of the semester. To register, submit the Master’s Thesis II Registration form, available on the Gallatin website. Once the adviser has approved the student’s form, Gallatin Student Services will send the student a permission number to register for the independent study section. When students register for the independent study section, they will be automatically enrolled in section one (CORE-GG 2403 001). The mandatory information session day/time is Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 5:30-6:15pm.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

WRTNG-UG1536 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Short Story: A Workshop on Revising

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Carol Zoref

Description

This workshop is dedicated to the oft-repeated observation that all writing is re-writing. Each writer focuses their efforts on only one or two short stories, rather than starting many new stories and abandoning them in favor of yet another new beginning. Students take each of their stories through a number of drafts and revise them in response to (though not necessarily in accord with) questions and comments raised by other members of the workshop. The objective is to learn ways of staying with such challenges as maintaining the story's voice, determining the order of experience, and arriving at an ending that satisfies the design of the story as well as the intentions of the writer. Workshop members share their stories in class throughout the semester and comment in detail on one another's work. Participants should have some experience writing short stories.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1861 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Modern Architectures of South Asia

4 units Wed
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Anooradha Siddiqi

Description

Struggles between nativisms and globalisms in architecture have produced significant iterations in South Asia; architecture’s modern practices and discourses within and outside the region have refracted a colonial and imperial imagery, national visions, regional and vernacular aesthetic inflections, and artistic, urban, and territorial worldviews. This course will focus on a history of architecture and planning that interrogates a history of South Asian modernism and modernity, examining constructions of each from within and beyond the subcontinent and its diasporas, through architecture’s many forms, including artifacts and practices of formal and informal building, territorial construction, photographic representation and other spatial imagery, criticism and writing, pedagogy, exhibitions and other public activity, and discourses on aesthetics. Course material spans the mid-nineteenth century to the present, and includes the study of work by both celebrated and little-known actors such as Edwin Lutyens, Otto Koenigsberger, Minnette de Silva, Louis Kahn, Charles Correa, and Brinda Somaya, and the projects of institutions and initiatives such as the Archaeological Survey of India and the Urban Study Group in Bangladesh. We will explore a range of writings, from Sir Banister Fletcher’s A History of Architecture to the journals MARG and Mimar, as well as architectural pedagogy as introduced to the subcontinent (and the colonies) in the Sir J.J. School of Art in what was once Bombay, and much later in the Centre for Environment Planning & Technology (CEPT) School of Architecture in Ahmedabad. We will also examine formal and informal urbanisms of sites such as Delhi, Chandigarh, Dhaka, and Dharavi, as well as geographies and architectures of war, scarcity, and borders, for which South Asia has become emblematic.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG787 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: The Detective Story: Solving Mysteries from Oedipus to Sherlock

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Paul Grimstad

Description

In the course we look closely at detective stories, novels and films, with attention to the basic narrative structure of criminal enigma and denouement and to the role in these works of interpretation. Starting with the proto-detective story  Oedipus Rex  we move on to Edgar Allan Poe’s invention of the genre proper in “The Murders in the Rue Morgue.” We then go on to read Poe's first “golden age” inheritors (Doyle's  The Hound of the Baskervilles  and its recent adaptation as part of the BBC television series  Sherlock);  the American “hard-boiled” writers ( The Maltese Falcon  and John Huston’s 1941 film adapation ) ; stories, plays and novels in which the reader must assume the role of detective ( The Murder Of Roger Ackroyd , “The Turn of the Screw”;  The Real Life of Sebastian Knight ); non-fiction forms which share some of the narrative features of detection (Freud’s “Wolf-Man” case study); neo-noir films ( Chinatown)  and works that mix detective fiction with science-fiction ( Minority Report) 

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1313 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Ethics for Dissenters

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bill Caspary

Description

This course is about dissent in a double sense: criticizing accepted ethical values, and criticizing old ways of philosophical thought about ethics. It is about affirmative ethics, not just criticism. Over the years the course has grown into a survey of classic writings in ethical philosophy from Socrates to Sartre. One half of the class is devoted to the classical Greek thought of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics. There is a brief critical look at Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. The modern period covers the ethics of Romanticism, Marxism, Pragmatism, Existentialism, and Feminism—as dissenting alternatives to mainstream Kantian and utilitarian ethics. Authors include Dewey, Emerson, Hegel, Gilligan, James, Marx, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Schiller. From these texts perspectives emerge on: (1) criticizing unjust (e.g. sexist) ethical standards, and inventing fair ones; (2) choosing ethical careers and life paths; (3) recognizing responsibilities to the larger community; (4) resolving ethical dilemmas; (5) forming and justifying visions of a better world; (6) dialoguing productively with adversaries by respecting different ethical positions without the cop-out of "anything goes;" and (7) getting beyond dead-end debate on idealism/realism, egotism/altruism, objectivism/relativism.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1908 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Race and Criminal Law

4 units Tue
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Anthony Thompson

Description

This course will examine the relationship between race and criminal law in the United States. Through the use of legal cases, law review articles and contemporary analyses and critiques, the course will expose students to the ways that race has shaped the criminal law and its administration. The goal of the course is to explore both the historical and contemporary treatment of race in the United States by the courts, policy-makers and to examine the construction of race as a concept and identity in the law. Students will gain a basic understanding of legal decision-making at the various discretionary points in the criminal process and how race informs the exercise of discretion.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1921 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Consumerist Gaze

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Lisa Daily

Description

Through a critical exploration of ‘the consumerist gaze,’ this class considers how global capitalism as a process of production and consumption is mediated by the circulation of commodity images. More specifically, we seek to understand the role of commodity images in shaping consumer practices and politics, ways of thinking and seeing, and notions of belonging and difference. In the contemporary moment, that which is gazed upon takes any number of avenues from promises for a better self, environment, or world to images of racialized, exoticized, gendered, sexualized, classed, and ‘othered’ bodies and ways of being. While we will consider the origins of ‘the gaze’ as a theoretical approach, the consumerist variety acts as an especially useful framework by employing an interdisciplinary lens that utilizes cultural theory, visual culture, critical geography, business and advertising ethics, and political economy. Possible case studies and topics include: the United Colors of Benetton “Sentenced to Death” campaign, TOMS Shoes’ visualization of ethics in its model of poverty alleviation and examples of ‘poverty-porn,’ the ‘pinking’ of breast cancer awareness products, and commodity-activism. Possible readings include Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall, Jean Baudrillard, Laura Mulvey, Anne McClintock, Teju Cole, Sut Jhally, Roland Barthes, and Walter Benjamin.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Fiction Writing

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Chris Spain

Description

A workshop and introduction to the story writing concepts—theatre of the mind, evoking, thingness, story time, character want, reader want, consistency—that story writers have used through the ages to accomplish that first and last task of every narrative, the waking of want in the reader to reach for the next page. We will “workshop” student drafts and favorite published fictions. With student work (turned in under deadline and duress) we will concentrate on potential as opposed to measuring drafts against the completed best. As best we can we will focus on "the how" of the craft of fiction as opposed to focusing on "the what" of what a story might have to say. Required materials: open mind, obsession to learn, humbleness mixed with arrogance (it takes a certain arrogance to imagine anyone would want to give up part of their life to read what you have written), a sense to be humored. Students turn in three drafts of fiction, each 10-14 pages long, to be critiqued in a workshop setting. Critiques are rigorous but constructive: no nastiness allowed.

Notes

Students may take "Fiction Writing" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ARTS-UG1573 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing for the Screen II

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Selma Thompson

Description

Writing for the Screen II provides a structured workshop environment in which students who have already completed a first draft of a feature-length screenplay can assess their work and take their writing to the next level by completing a second draft and a polish. Can the script be edited to improve pace and structure? Can the story be made more active and visual? Can more be done with character choices and setting? Are there ideas, themes, and/or jokes to further explore? Are there issues of story logic or continuity yet to be worked out? Is the story presented professionally, creatively using screenplay format to engage the reader? What elements make the script commercially viable and how might it be pitched? Writing a second draft is a creative adventure, a chance to see how far you can take your initial idea as your story grows richer and your characters start to come alive on the page. Texts include Russin and Downs,  Writing the Picture ; Mamet,  Bambi vs. Godzilla: The Nature, Purpose, and Practice of the Movie Business ; Goldman,  Adventures in the Screen Trade ; Lowenstein,  My First Movie: 20 Celebrated Directors Talk about Their First Film ; and the screenplay for  Chinatown  by Robert Towne.

Notes

Prerequisite ARTS-UG 1570 or DWPG-UT 35 or permission of instructor (st35@nyu.edu).

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ELEC-GG2644 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

From Raw Footage to Finished Film

4 units Mon
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Cheryl Furjanic

Description

This course is open to all filmmakers (fiction or non-fiction, experimental or otherwise) at all levels (beginner or advanced), but the expectation is that students will have shot a significant amount of footage prior to the course's start date and will complete a short film by the end of the course. In a collaborative workshop environment, students will work through aspects of the post-production process from screening raw footage and preparing footage for the edit, through editing and cinematic-problem-solving, to completing a short film. In addition to addressing practical concerns (editing, style, story structure, etc.), we will discuss related issues such as the importance of knowing how to situate your film within certain historical and representational paradigms. Who is the audience for your film? Where is the best “home” for your completed film? Projects may be extensions of research projects, fiction films, non-fiction films, animation, etc. Students will be required to read extensively about film history and technique, complete weekly editing/production assignments, and attend screenings outside of class hours. Over the course of the semester, every film will be given a lot of individualized attention so students are expected to engage with the variety of projects being undertaken by their peers and to participate actively in class workshops and discussions. Classes will sometimes include guest lectures by filmmakers. Students may edit on whichever platform is most comfortable and/or accessible.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (cheryl.furjanic@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1781 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

A Sense of Place

2 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Steve Hutkins

Description

This course examines the places in which we work and play, travel and dwell—the office tower and the suburban house, the city street and the superhighway, the small town and the megalopolis, the shopping mall and the theme park, the American road and foreign places. Synthesizing insights from literary works and fields like cultural geography, landscape studies, and architectural history, we explore such questions as: What gives a place its particular feel or character? How do our values and worldview affect the way we experience places, and what constitutes that experience? How do places—and the way they are represented in literature and other media—shape our attitudes and behavior? What gives a place "quality," and how can we design and build better places? Readings may include J. B. Jackson’s  Landscape in Sight , Yi-Fu Tuan’s  Space and Place , James Kunstler’s  The Geography of Nowhere , D. J. Waldie’s  Holy Land , Italo Calvino’s  Invisible Cities , and Michael Sorkin’s  Twenty Minutes in Manhattan .

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 27; Last Class: March 10.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG779 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Imagining the Library

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Gregory Erickson

Description

From the legendary ancient library in Alexandria to the medieval monastic library at Melk to the Library of Congress to the new fully digital library at Florida Polytechnic University, how we imagine, remember, and construct our libraries is indicative of how we narrate our cultural identity. In modern fiction, texts such as Jorge Borges’ “The Library of Babel,” Umberto Eco’s The Name of the Rose, and the Harry Potter books use libraries to speculate about our world using the organization of great fictional libraries from the past and the future as metaphors for human thought. To imagine a library is to ask: What is worth preserving? Who has access to certain information? How do we organize this information? In addition to actual and imaginary libraries, class topics include the history of the book and of reading, the concept of scripture, theories of the archive, and the significance of new media and digital technology. Readings may include works by Plato, Aristotle, Joyce, Bradbury, Orwell, Benjamin, Derrida, Murakami, Anthony Grafton and N. Katherine Hayles. Examples from film and television may include Harry Potter, The Book of Eli, and Doctor Who. Student research projects and papers might explore the history, theory, or architecture of actual libraries new and old; they may look at the role of libraries in education, research, and in speculative fiction about the future of humankind. The course will include guest speakers and site visits.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1623 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Green Design and Planning

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Donna Goodman

Description

In recent decades, architects and planners have faced a new set of challenges. The world population has tripled in less than a century. Demand for food, water, housing, energy, products, and services has grown at an even faster pace. In response to these issues, the design professions have created new concepts for green architecture, sustainable cities, alternative infrastructure and products. They've also introduced new laws and environmental standards. This course presents green design and planning concepts through readings, discussions, lectures, films, and projects. Students write a short paper and create three design projects. The papers examine issues such as energy, transportation, recycling, planning, and design. The projects include design of a recycled product, planning of a roof terrace or small green building, and analysis of an urban park or neighborhood. The projects are developed through maps, photographs, computer diagrams, and architectural drawings.

Notes

Section 2 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1906 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Culture and Politics: An Exploration of Cuban Cinema Since the 1959 Revolution

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 7:35 PM
Valerie Forman

Description

In this course we will explore the rich and complex cinematic tradition that has developed in Cuba since the Revolution. Our particular focus will be on the conversation between the films and social and political life in Cuba. Some questions that will guide our investigation follow: if the implementation of the Revolution required a new way of imagining one’s political, social, and economic self in relation to one’s larger community, what was cinema’s role in that imagination? How has Cuban cinema negotiated complex issues surrounding shifting socio-economic practices: for example, the radical increase in the number of women in the workforce; declarations of racial equality; and housing shortages? How did Cuban Cinema continue to provide a form and forum for debate about Cuba’s role in the world: for example, the US Embargo/Blockade, the war in Angola, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the influx of foreign tourists that began in the 1990s? We will view a wide range of filmic genres and forms: newsreels, documentaries, narrative features, as well as recent short and feature length films produced with new technology. We will also attend the screening of at least one film at the 18th Annual Havana Film Festival New York. In addition to weekly film viewings, readings about Cuban economic, social, and political life will be central to the course and will contribute to our understanding of the many changes that have taken place in Cuban culture and politics in the past fifty-seven years. Some likely texts and films for the course include: Tomás Gutiérrez Alea,  Memories of Underdevelopment ; Sara Gómez,  One Way or Another ; Humberto Solás,  Lucia ; Fernando Pérez,  Life is to Whistle  (1998); Ernesto Darnas,  Behavior ; Gloria Rolando , Breaking the Silence;  Channan,  Cuban Cinema ; Ann Marie Stock,  On Location in Cuba: Street Filmmaking during Times of Transition. 

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Creative Writing: Argentina, Travel Writing at the End of the World

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Type

Global Programs (WRTNG-UG)

WRTNG-UG1544 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing Fiction in the Digital Age

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Lara Vapnyar

Description

The main goal of this course is to provide students with ways how to enhance traditional storytelling by new technologies without diminishing the role of the written word. We will examine every aspect of the craft of traditional fiction writing: plot, structure, point of view, narrative voice, dialogue, building of individual scenes, etc as well as the new techniques of the digital age: hypertext, visual and audio images, social media. We will learn how to balance the traditional with the new without overwhelming the written text with gadgets. The class will become a creative lab studying ideas by others, coming up with their own, presenting their fiction, responding to the writing of others, and discussing questions about literature, editing, and publishing in the digital age. Each student will create and present to class a work of fiction based on some of the ideas we will be discussing. The works don’t have to be in the electronic form, but the students will need to explain how they would work. Each student will create a basic website with a writer’s profile and portfolio of her works. Readings will include fiction by: Borges, Nabokov, Michael Joyce, Margaret Atwood, Jennifer Egan.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1788 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Sublime

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Bradley Lewis

Description

Art of the sublime stirs up strong emotions and competing evaluations. Often labeled “indescribable,” the sublime has been debated for centuries amongst writers, poets, artists, and philosophers. The concept goes back to classical Greece, but it became particularly important in eighteenth century Europe. At that time the sublime was applied in relation to the creative arts to describe aspects of nature that instill awe and wonder such as mountains, avalanches, waterfalls, stormy seas, or the infinite vault of the starry sky. In the wake of the French Revolution, the sublime for the Romantics became a quasi-secular route to cultural and aesthetic freedom through contact with the unbounded and the supersensible. In our contemporary world, where culture and gender difference, psychoanalysis, postmodern theory, technology, neuroscience, and neoliberal spectacle seem to eclipse former concepts of nature and transcendent experience, the characteristics of the sublime are perhaps more fuzzy than ever. The term and the debates however remain very much alive and relevant to contemporary aesthetic, metaphysical, and ethical concerns. This course will examine theories of the sublime in writers and artists from ancient to postmodern, including Longinus, Burke, Kant, Wordsworth, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Newman, Rosenblum, Lyotard, Deleuze, Kristeva, and Viola.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1860 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Technology and Environment

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Rachel Rothschild

Description

In this seminar, students will examine how technological developments have altered the environment and our experience of it. How have environmental contingencies shaped the design of technological systems? How have technologies, in turn, generated novel ways of conceptualizing the planet and our place in the universe, and how have they influenced our treatment of the environment? We will analyze cases where technological change has arguably damaged the environment as well as instances where technologies have provided solutions to environmental challenges. Students will be asked to engage with a number of scholarly conversations around nature as a historical actor and agent, the meaning of natural and artificial, and historical mythologies of both technological progress and technology's intrinsic hostility to the environment. Readings will include excerpts from the work of Patrick Geddes and Carl Sagan as well as Richard White’s The Organic Machine, Kate Brown’s Plutopia, and Michael Bess’s The Light Green Society.

Notes

Sect 002 for Environmental Studies majors.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9100 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BERLIN: European Environmental Policy

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. The course gives an introduction to various aspects of EU environmental policy making and policy implementation. After a brief recap of the basics of policy making in the EU, students will learn about the guiding principles and developments within EU environmental policy, the main actors and their interests in and influence on policy making. An optional part of the course might be a visit to the European House of the European Commission (EC) in Berlin where students either have the opportunity to role-play the decision-making process of the EC on the introduction of CO2-standards for cars or to engage in a debate with an EC representative. The second half of the course analyses EU environmental policies in different issue areas (e.g. climate change, biodiversity, waste) for their effectiveness in solving environmental problems. Different policy instruments are discussed for their merits and shortcomings (one example will be the EU Emissions Trading System) and linkages to other issue areas of EU policy making (e.g. industry and agriculture) are discussed. Finally, the course provides an international perspective on EU environmental policy making: sessions will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of EU environmental policy making at home and in international negotiations, compare it with US environmental politics, and discuss future challenges (e.g. EU enlargement) and trends for EU environmental governance.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1072 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Poets in Protest: Footsteps to Hip-Hop

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This seminar examines the tradition of poetic protest in the African Diaspora. From the Harlem Renaissance and Négritude to the Black Liberation Movement of the '60s and today's Hip-Hop/Rap explosion, poets, lyricists and rap/hip-hop artists have sought to reclaim and reshape images of themselves and their communal experiences. Through comparative and critical analysis of historical works, songs, and poetry, we come to a deeper understanding of the common thematic and aesthetic approaches of these movements as they continue to alter the discourse on race and liberation. Texts may include Michael Richardson, ed.,  Refusal of the Shadow: Surrealism and the Caribbean ; David L. Lewis, ed.,  The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader ; films such as Euzhan Palcy,  Sugar Cane Alley , and Tony Silver and Henry Chalfant,  Style Wars ; and samples from Langston Hughes, Amiri Baraka, KRS-One, Dead Prez, and Tupac Shakur.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721 005.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

PRACT-UG1475 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Policy, Community, and Self

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eric Brettschneider

Description

Intended to introduce policy, this course includes an internship at a policy and/or advocacy organization. Community building, service integration and child welfare are featured in readings, discussion, and internships. Through examples such as ethnic-matching placements in foster care, zero-tolerance approaches to drug abuse, or public financing of political campaigns, students come to understand how government, schools, gangs, religious institutions and families can, with varying degrees of explicitness and formality, all make policy. Students at the course conclusion are able to: identify policies within their lives; argue all sides of a policy question; appreciate the importance of evidence; and distinguish implementation from formulation. Readings include  Bowling Alone , by Robert Putnam, and  The Lost Children of Wilder , by Nina Bernstein. Students will be helped to connect meetings they attend and the policy concepts taught and discussed in class. The goal is to leave no student unaware of the importance of policy in their own and their community's life. The course focuses on policies that are empowering. Assignments include an internship journal.

Notes

Offered previously as CLI-UG 1466. Students who have taken CLI-UG 1466 should not register for PRACT-UG 1475—the course is not repeatable.

Type

Practicum (PRACT-UG)

FIRST-UG789 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Power and Politics

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Alison Heslin

Description

To study politics is to study power, and as such, this course addresses the production, conservation, and distribution of power, addressing questions such as: What is power? How is power exerted? How is it gained and lost? How do power centers get challenged? We begin with theoretical understandings of power, applying philosophical and sociological theories of power to social problems including global inequality, national welfare policy, residential patterns, and racial and gender discrimination. We investigate the mechanisms by which groups maintain power historically and currently including the use of force, the control of media, and the dissemination of propaganda through art, film, and literature. Lastly, we address challenges to power structures posed by social movements. Authors include Mills, Chomsky, Gaventa, and Domhoff.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1699 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Feeling, in Theory

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Eve Meltzer

Description

Over the past two decades, scholars from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives—literature, women’s studies, political science, and aesthetics, to name a few—have returned to the question of “affect,” also referred to as “feeling” or “emotion,” as well as “passion,” “pathos,” “mood,” or even “love.” This course aims to familiarize students with the field of “affect theory” by surveying some of the most important texts that ground it (such as Aristotle, Raymond Williams, Freud, and Tomkins) as well as several that have emerged more recently (Deleuze and Guattari, Massumi, Ahmed, Ngai, among others). Much of our work together will be to read closely some very difficult theoretical texts, each of which attempts to describe what affect is, and why it matters to and for a wide range of experiences: political, aesthetic, musical, and psychic, among them. Additionally, over the course of the semester we will focus on some specific affective states and the texts that have grappled with their deep structure—from “cruel optimism," to happiness, anxiety, boredom, and depression. Lastly, we will undertake some experimental work by collaborating to produce what we might call "affective events" that may serve to instruct, persuade, or otherwise make an impact through affective means. While this course has no prerequisites, it is particularly appropriate for students who have some exposure to structuralist, poststructuralist, and/or postmodernist discourses, and are also up for the challenge of reading some rather difficult theoretical material.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1106 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Knowing Body: Awareness Techniques for Performers

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Robin Powell

Description

Mind/body awareness techniques increase one's ability to strip away any physical and mental interference which impair performance and often appear as stiff, held muscles, poor body habits and interrupted concentration. These methods are vital to the creative process and help students to honor inner knowledge. In this workshop, performance is viewed in terms of posture, breath, tension/effort, energy/presence, concentration, body behaviors/habits, and mind/body integration. Students must be prepared to perform a solo piece of their chosing (or an activity to be observed) by the third week of class and work on it throughout the semester. Kinetic Awareness, the Alexander Technique, meditation, visualization, and Eastern energy systems are learned and applied to the student's performance piece. Open to performing arts students who wish to deepen their relationship to their bodies, increase awareness, and draw on inner reserves. Readings include Knaster's  Discovering the Body's Wisdom , Steinman's  The Knowing Body , Crow's  The Alexander Technique as a Basic Approach to Theatrical Training , and Kohnlein's  Listening from the Physical Body .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1922 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Globalization, Migration, and Statelessness

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Alison Heslin

Description

Profound changes in global exchanges of goods, ideas and labor in the 20th century require scholars to critically engage with notions of citizenship, belonging, and inclusion. For this reason, the study of refugees and migrants is important both as a way of gaining useful knowledge and as a vehicle for deepening one’s understanding the worsening problems of displacement in the 21st century.  Globalization, Migration, and Statelessness  engages students in the realities of the global flows of people – applying theories of citizenship and belonging to understand the spectrum of labor coercion, the refugee camp as non-place, and the ways in which free capital may be at odds with regulated bodies. Readings include Marshall Thomas, Linda Bosniak, Lisa Marie Cacho, and Ronaldo Munck.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG9501 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

SYDNEY: Creative Writing

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-SYDNEY. In this creative writing class students will produce work informed by their experiences of exploring, learning about, and being in Sydney. Students are encouraged to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing, and to consider the palimpsestic environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) they interact with and within. Students will engage with a diverse range of readings, identifying their technical elements and discussing their affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Students shall workshop their works-in-progress during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique during the drafting process. At the end of the course students will have the opportunity to collectively self-publish their work as a physical zine and/or an online blog.

Type

Global Programs (WRTNG-UG)

ELEC-GG2601 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Arts of Intervention: Social Practices in Public Spaces

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Mark Read

Description

The contemporary art world is replete with artists that perform or install works in public spaces as a method of provoking critical dialogue about the social, political, and economic conditions that shape modern life. In this course, you will engage with the emerging field of social practice: socially oriented research and practice by artists that includes but is not limited to urban interventions, utopian proposals, guerrilla architecture, “new genre” public art, social sculpture, project-based community practice, interactive media, service dispersals, street performance, and social media. This course examines how the idea of public space has evolved over time, up to and including considerations of virtual public space. In this course we will consider artists as members of society who intervene in and create structures of participation, frequently with the intention of changing the actual, economic and political conditions that construct social reality. We will research and produce projects about complex social sites of power like The Classroom, The Library, The Newspaper, The Walk, The Lecture, The Potluck, The Road Trip, The Party, The Salon, and The Community Center. Students will examine and discuss the work of contemporary artists such as The Guerilla Girls, Krysztof Wodiczco, The Yes Men, Martha Rosler, Rick Lowe and Suzanne Lazy. We will read and discuss the work of authors such as Lucy Lippard, Shannon Jackson, Clare Bishop, Henri Lefebvre, Guy Debord, Pablo Helguera, Nato Thompson, Greg Sholette and Grant Kester.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (mr105@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1144 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Free Speech and Democracy

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Paul Thaler

Description

The tension between free expression and social control has shadowed the Great American Conversation since the birth of this country. The constitutional ideal that our government "shall make no law" abridging free speech has given way, in fact, to laws that limit discussion, ostensibly for the public good. Likewise, new media technologies advance our ability to access and exchange ideas and information, but raise new questions as to the limits of such dialogue. This course, then, addresses the delicate balance between free speech and democracy, guided by seminal readings from Milton, Locke, Meikeljohn, among others, as well as important Supreme Court decisions that have critically shaped First Amendment rights in regard to hate speech, pornography, corporate control of mass media, the student press and the rights of journalists. The course also takes a case-study approach to issues related to free speech in wartime and political crisis, a tension made evident in recent debates over privacy rights and national security. With this foundation, we ask: Are there any forms of free speech that should be restricted? If so, which? And, who should decide?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1306 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Courage to Sound Like Ourselves

4 units Mon Wed
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Scott Korb

Description

Beginning with a careful reading of Joan Didion’s “On Self-Respect” (1961), and through ongoing considerations of other personal essays, this advanced writing course asks students to reckon with the essential value of their own mind—their thinking—in developing a narrative voice that can develop over a lifetime. In light of what’s been called the “radical critique of interiority and autonomy” carried out by much of literary theory, this course makes an effort to revalue the self at the heart of self-respect. We ask: What happens when we hand our thoughts over to our voice? Why do we believe what we believe? Do we have the courage—even the “courage of our mistakes,” as Didion writes—to sound like ourselves? Students will be required to write three personal essays, one that draws evidence primarily from their lives, one that engages critically with texts, and a third that situates the writer in the midst of a social, cultural, or political movement or issue. Readings will include the scholar Lisa Ruddick (quoted above), and essayists Leslie Jamison, Zora Neale Hurston, Zadie Smith, Cheryl Strayed, Francine Prose, and Marilynne Robinson, among others.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

ARTS-UG1012 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Acting: Rehearsing the Play

4 units Tue
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Ben Steinfeld

Description

This class approaches acting from the belief that an actor's job is learning how to rehearse. During the semester we investigate what makes for joyful, effective, and exciting rehearsal, striving to develop a process that is as powerful as any performance. How do we make the events of the play happen "in the room?" How do we take responsibility for what our character says and does from the first read-through? How do we connect with poetic or complicated language? How do we speak and listen from the same "place?" What is the purpose of "table work?" How do we make authentic physical choices? As we pursue these questions, we engage with several of the actor's technical and artistic challenges and focus on developing the acting instrument through voice and speech, physicality, and style work. We begin with Shakespearean monologues to build a common vocabulary, and move to modern and contemporary scene work that culminates in a public presentation—giving each student the chance to share his/her work with an audience. Students must wear appropriate rehearsal clothes and will be asked to rehearse outside of class time.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ARTS-UG1270 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Excavating Titus Andronicus: Exploration and Embodiment

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Leslie Satin

Description

Shakespeare’s  Titus Andronicus  is a tragedy of extreme proportions, notorious for its portrayal of ceaseless violence, death, and mutilation driven by desires for power and revenge. In this Gallatin Arts Workshop, which will culminate in a performance of several scenes of the play, students will delve into the work from multiple perspectives. These include the text itself; its literary, historical, and cultural antecedents; its contemporary implications; and, especially, the ways to animate these discoveries—and reciprocally contribute to them—through studio practice joining dance, movement, and theater. This Practice as Research offers students opportunities to explore their characters, to broaden their ideas and experiences of performance itself, to understand embodied knowledge as critical and performative, and to develop their acting skills. A collaborative arts workshop, Excavating  Titus Andronicus  will be led by Prof. Leslie Satin, dancer/choreographer and performance scholar, and by guest artists Prof. Christian Billing and Prof. Campbell Edinborough, theater and performance artists and scholars from the University of Hull in England, with visits to the class from Gallatin scholars and practitioners in theater and literature. Readings will include  Titus Andronicus,  excerpts of Ovid’s  Metamorphoses , critical literature on these texts, and literature on dance, performance, space, and embodiment.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

WRTNG-UG1355 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing for Children: Magic, Memoir, and Mystery

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Lizzie Skurnick

Description

Children's literature contains an astonishing breadth of genres and voices. In Writing for Children, we'll be covering familiar tropes, such as orphans, time travel, ghosts, magic, dystopias, and the wilderness, reading everything from classics such as Frances Hodgson Burnett's “A Little Princess” to The Great Brain series to contemporary works, including Maile Meloy's “The Apothecary.” Along the way, we will also explore the complexities of race, class, and feminism in children's literature, as well as its changing role in the canon and marketplace. Students will workshop their own writing, and are invited to include novels-in-progress. The class will also include visits from leading children's authors, agents, and critics in the field.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

FIRST-UG709 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Language and the Political

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Andrew Libby

Description

How does language affect how we think about political possibilities? How have writers and activists sought to change society through changing how we use language? How is rhetoric used politically, in essays, law, oratory, propaganda, and poetry? We read arguments about the interplay of language and the political, think about political theory, examine political rhetoric, and study literary works. We write about the power of rhetoric to form and criticize political practices: movements for civil rights, human rights, rights for women, workers’ rights, and animal rights. We investigate in detail how language participates in our ideas about rights, ethics, political action, and social justice. And we examine the affective dimensions of this interaction of language, ideas, and values. After familiarizing ourselves with various approaches to thinking about political and social relations, you can then explore in depth an issue of social justice that animates you. This means that we use the reading to focus your critical thinking capacities, expand your horizons, and communicate the results of these processes in writing that is persuasive, coherent, exhilarating, meaningful. Readings may include works by Plato, Alice Walker, Thomas Jefferson, Karl Marx, Margaret Fuller, Henry David Thoreau, Mohandas Mahatma Gandhi, Hannah Arendt, Judith Butler, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Malcolm X, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Ursula LeGuin.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1306 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Contemporary Music Performance II

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
John Castellano

Description

This course continues where Contemporary Music Performance I leaves off, but can be taken as an individual course for those who have some music background. This course focuses on helping students develop a deeper understanding of popular music and jazz by having the opportunity to experience the creation of music first hand - as a musician and composer. After reviewing the basics of music theory and working on strengthening musicianship skills, students have the opportunity to write, rehearse, and perform, original ensemble pieces on a weekly basis. The principle course goal is for each student to be able to conceive of, compose, and perform original contemporary pieces of music in a wide range of pop and jazz idioms. The class meets in a professional fully equipped music studio where students have access to a variety of musical instruments and equipment, and culminates with a public recital of musical works written and performed by students.

Notes

Suggested prerequisite: ARTS-UG 1305 (or equivalent). Lab fee: $35. Course meets at Drummer's Collective, 541 Sixth Avenue.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

INDIV-UG9150 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course is designed as a small seminar and combines weekly section meetings, together with internships in organizations in Argentina. The academic part is meant to assist students in getting the most from their internship experience and provide theoretical and methodological elements to critically examine these experiences. It weaves together research design and methods with an empirical and theoretical examination of recent social phenomena in Argentina. The goal is to acquire an in-depth understanding of the organization in which students will conduct internships, as well as reflect on the experience. We will use selected themes and topics to explore theoretical perspectives and aspects of contemporary Argentine society. In parallel we will explore how to construct a research project, collect data and analyze its contents. In the first weeks we will work together to develop research topics, shape projects, discuss techniques for conducting fieldwork research. The second part will focus on the student’s individual work experience and research projects.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG9100 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BERLIN: Berlin's Modern History and Culture: A European Perspective

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. Germany’s profound influence on Modern European history and culture is felt nowhere as visibly as in Berlin. This interdisciplinary course analyzes the city’s contributions to culture––in literature, memoir, music, film and painting––and its politics in the wider context of European trends. The course provides a comprehensive survey of Modern Berlin history and examines how artists reflected on those changing times. Special topics include: Christopher Isherwood’s fictionalized memoirs during the Weimar Years, the Nazi Aesthetic during the Berlin 1936 Olympics as constructed by filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl, the photo-realist reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary reassessment of guilt and victimhood following reunification. Readings and lectures are supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and cultural change in situ; how memory, history and place interact over time in specific locations.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1924 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

The Afro-Arabic World

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Sophia Azeb

Description

Who is an Arab? Where does the “Middle East” end and Africa begin? This course will explore how Arabic-speaking and African-descended peoples have engaged one another and the overlapping configurations of blackness and Arabness that have long circulated in the African Diaspora. Though “Arabs” are popularly imagined in the West through long-held Orientalist stereotypes of the exotic, brown, and uncivilized “other,” many Africans and African Americans were inspired by the Arab anti-colonial culture and politics they encountered during the World Wars. Similarly, as Arabs sought to counter harmful colonial misrepresentations, they looked to the transnational, anti-racist philosophies and movements that African Americans and other African diasporic figures pioneered. These exchanges resulted in surprising moments of solidarity, like the Black Panther Party’s first international chapter in Algeria, and the late Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser’s funding of Malcolm X’s travels through Africa. Through a historical and cultural survey of black and Arab thought through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries – a recent field of inquiry we will call “Afro-Arab Studies” – this class will examine the parallel and intersecting narratives of a range of significant Afro-Arab confluences, including but not limited to: négritude and pan-Arabism, the U.S. Civil Rights and Black Power movements and global anti-colonialism, cultural manifestations of the Non-Aligned and Pan-Africanist movements, and recent Black/Palestinian solidarity organizing. Readings will include narrative essays, political biography, historical monographs, and cultural theory by such writers, poets, and scholars as James Baldwin, Frantz Fanon, June Jordan, Alex Lubin, and Theri A. Pickens.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1891 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Tinkering in Feminist Technoscience

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Cyd Cipolla

Description

This course uses the concept of tinkering to explore the innate links between "maker" culture and feminist studies of science. Something more than novice, but less than expert, a tinkerer is one who tests boundaries and innovates through fresh perspective, often working outside of a professional context. Students in this class will learn the theoretical tools of feminist technoscience studies, noting how the topics of scientific research are guided by, and tacitly reinforce, sexist stereotypes and assumptions, and question whether it is possible to change the methods and the ideas that justify scientific knowledge itself. Along the way, students will become tinkerers in a literal sense by completing a robotic, wearable technology, or coding project of their own. Together, we will consider the radical potential of building from scratch in the digital age, the ethical imperative to re-write the world around us, and the philosophical experience of tinkering with knowledge itself. For in feminist critical theory, it is not enough to take things apart: we must also put them back together. No prior experience in building, coding, electronics or feminist theory required.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9050 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

ACCRA: Cocoa and Gold: Ghana’s Development in Global Perspective

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-ACCRA. This course explores Ghana’s development from the colonial era to the recent postcolonial period, providing an interdisciplinary history that is attentive to political economy, social relations, geography, and politics as they congeal throughout Ghana’s development. Key historical moments will include the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the colonial era in light of their attendant reconfigurations of land, labor, and natural resources—as well as landscapes of power and politics. In the postcolonial period, the course will examine the central epochs in the country’s development trajectory in relation to its rich political history and shifting global discourses of development and geopolitics. This will include a focus on dynamics such as Asian investment, urbanization, international development aid, and the discovery of oil. The goal of the course is to explore theories and debates on development through deep engagement, using Ghana as a sort of intensive case study. Ghana’s specific development trajectory will in turn be located alongside that of wider Africa and the global South, and alongside development debates and discourses whenever possible. Field trips will include visits to sites such as local gold mines and cocoa fields.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1560 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Art and Craft of Poetry

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Emily Fragos

Description

In this workshop, poets will focus on the foundations and intricate dynamics of poetry as a writer’s process. A weekly reading of a new poem by each poet in the circle will serve as point of departure for discussion of the relationships of craft and expression. A final portfolio of polished poems is required at the end of the course.

Notes

Students may take "The Art and Craft of Poetry" two times.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG9357 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

PARIS: Urban Ethnography

4 units
Beth Epstein

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE IN PARIS: Taking the city, and specifically the city of Paris, as its focus, this course explores what anthropology can bring to an understanding of cities and urban life. Complex spaces that at once create, sustain, and transgress various forms of social and cultural distinction, cities pose particular challenges for the ethnographer in pursuit of fine-grained analysis that takes into account the multiple and transecting strands of the urban metropolis. In this course, we study various forms of ethnographic analysis in order to gain insight into the particularities of Paris and the broader historic, social, economic, and political phenomena that the city and its spatial organization reveal. Working out from an understanding of urban space as a socially and politically meaningful site of claims-making and contestation, we consider the importance of consumption and display in shaping urban identities, and of the shifting dynamics of groups and boundaries within the urban context. Alongside their investigation of the city, students also have an opportunity to develop their skills in ethnographic research methods. Exercises in participant-observation and and in the transformation of first-hand experience into a finished piece of ethnographic work allow students a chance to gain appreciation for the complexities of “the field” while developing insight into a corner of Parisian life. Through critical reading of texts in urban anthropology and related fields, site visits in and around Paris, and methodology workshops wherein students explore the “doing” of field research, the course allows students an opportunity to deepen their knowledge of Paris and of the complexity more broadly of city life.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1821 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Democracy and Difference

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Rosanne Kennedy

Description

This seminar focuses on what political theorists call "democratic theory," which addresses the defining institutions, cultural meaning, inherent difficulties, and contemporary crisis of specifically "democratic" forms of political life. We begin by reviewing classical and contemporary formulations of what democracy is, for what can be called liberal, deliberative, communitarian, and agonistic approaches entail very definitions of democracy, contrasting senses of its dangers and possibilities, as well as divergent visions of citizenship and public life, political culture and modernity. Then we consider these approaches in relation to the issue of  difference:  how do they explain and address the persistence of racialized and gendered forms of inequality in regimes committed to formal and legal equality? Why are formally democratic societies typically characterized by intense struggle over issues of identity and difference, not only race, gender, and sexuality, but also immigration? Our seminar concludes by exploring the relation between democratic regimes and empire, state violence, and national security: how does "democracy" become the name for a regime engaged in permanent war, torture, surveillance of citizens, and suspension of civil liberties?

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1116 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

Fate and Free Will in the Epic Tradition

4 units Wed
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Antonio Rutigliano

Description

The role of the gods in human affairs inevitably raises the question of fate and free will. The epics, from the ancient world to the Renaissance, frequently reflect and define this debate. This course examines how the epics of Homer, Vergil, Dante and Milton not only mirror the philosophical and theological perceptions of the period, but sometimes forecast future debates on the issue. Readings may include the  Epic of Gilgamesh, Iliad  or  Odyssey, Aeneid,  and  Divine Comedy,  as well as selections from Plato's  Protagoras  or Aristotle's  Ethics , Cicero's  De Fato , Boethius's  Consolation of Philosophy , and Fromm's  Escape From Freedom .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1409 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Topics in Painting

4 units Mon
8:55 AM - 12:15 PM
Meleko Mokgosi

Description

In this workshop, students expand the skills and techniques initiated in Introduction to Painting. This course will focus on portraiture and realism, with emphasis on representation and the effects of the human figure in various settings and narratives. Additionally, contemporary ideas and practices will be incorporated into the class along with group and individual critiques.

Notes

Same as ART-UE 1140. Prerequisite: ARTS-UG 1407 or ARTS-UE 103 or permission of the instructor (mmokgosi@nyu.edu). Lab fee: $350

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1927 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Frantz Fanon: Humanism, Revolution and the Decolonization of the Mind

2 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Millery Polyné

Description

This class investigates the architecture and history of colonialism and neo-colonialism and its intersections with race, gender and labor within Martinique, Haiti and Algeria in the 20th century. The life and work of Martinican-born psychoanalyst and social philosopher Frantz Fanon is the central lens in which we will interrogate (neo)colonialism and citizen responses to the psycho-social world that imperial encounters made. By examining several key texts, including  Wretched of the Earth  (1961),  Black Skin, White Masks (1952)  and  A Dying Colonialism  (1965) and a number of films, this course poses a number of key questions: What does it mean to be human? What does wo/man want? In what ways does Fanon's discussion of existentialism, alienation or even the idea or the materiality of the veil prove relevant to current political and social tensions and movements in the United States and abroad? Is there a "healing psychological force" in revolutionary action? Fanon's work is an important piece in understanding the development and intervention of mid-twentieth century critical theory and intellectual history in the Atlantic world.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 26; Last Class: March 9.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1919 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Fashion: The Art, the Politics, the Performance

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Rhonda Garelick

Description

This seminar is devoted to the modern legacy of fashion, to understanding how the 19th and 20th centuries shaped fashion and how fashion shapes us today in the 21st. We shall explore the sexual politics of fashion, its philosophical relationship to temporality (its relentless and impossible pursuit of the ‘now’), and its relationship to certain modernist art movements. Fashion, as opposed to traditional dress based on one’s social class or occupation, is a fairly recent phenomenon. Historians place the beginning of fashion in the early fifteenth century, concurrent with the burgeoning wool and silk trades of Flanders and Italy. One result of the increased trade and travel of this era was a new, growing awareness of what people were wearing beyond one’s own small community. A new desire was born: the wish to look like a figure in a picture, to imitate someone you might never have seen in person. The everyday act of dressing turned into a version of costuming the self, inhabiting a theatrical role, based on an imagined relationship to an image. Fashion, in other words, finds its roots in performance. This performance now plays out on a global stage and has become a multi-billion- dollar industry, raising a host of aesthetic, philosophical, and political questions: Can one opt out of this performance? For whom is fashion performed? How do we experience the duality or split implied by the daily creation of a ‘fashioned self’?

Notes

Section 1 reserved for students who have completed a Practicum in Fashion Business. Prerequisite: PRACT-UG 1301. Section 2 restricted to juniors and seniors who have taken advanced classes in literature, history, art history, or anthropology. All others permission of the instructor required (rkgar@earthlink.net).

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9350 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

PARIS: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

SASEM-UG9102 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BERLIN: Topics in German Cinema

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. Berlin is one of the most well-known film cities in the world. This course wants to introduce you to the study of German cinema by looking at changing images of the city since the postwar period. The course will begin with an introduction to film analysis, giving special attention to the relationship between film and city. We will go on to discuss a number of influential productions from East, West and reunified Germany, and draw comparisons to other German as well as non-German city films. Through seminar discussions, reading responses, and critical essays, you will gain an understanding of how the cinema has engaged with the city of Berlin and its transformations since the end of the Second World War.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9250 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This 4-credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork per week at an approved internship fieldsite. Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

ARTS-UG1480 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Photograph New York, Create Your Vision

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Jeff Day

Description

By giving us a sense of place, the city we inhabit recreates us. This documentary photography course explores New York City as the ever-changing environment in which we are involved. Embarking on a photographic project of their design, students depict a highly visible urban space (viewed as a world financial, cultural, artistic capital) through their own relationship to it: their ways of interacting, acting, and being moved. Classes prepare students to work on their position as photographers: as they make pictures in the streets of New York, they determine their own perception (vantage point, angle, point of view, framing) and establish a particular relationship with the audience (through scale, rhythm sequence, position, color). Exploring the boundaries between public and private space, feeling space and scale with the body (and not only with one's eyes) and creating a personal color palette are strongly encouraged. Students also explore a photographer's power to change audience perception, for example, through large scale installations inciting viewers to inhabit particular vantage points. Though documentary imagery is traditionally considered to establish a transparent relation to 'reality,' this course challenges students to recognize its created character and to recreate the city by influencing with their photographic intervention the ways it is perceived. Classes are highly collaborative, offering technical instruction, critiques of student work, debates on street photography, visual analysis and discussions with invited artists. Open to highly motivated students with or without experience in documentary photography; digital or film cameras welcome.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG771 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Building Better Humans

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Jordan Stein

Description

The idea that we can build better humans—humans who are smarter, happier, stronger, more beautiful, and with longer life spans—is no longer a remote possibility given recent advances in technology and genetics. This course will consider whether these technologies should be understood as a threat to humanity or as valuable tools in the progression of humans towards a post-human state of being. Specific questions to be addressed include: Would it be ethical to design babies to possess a desired set of attributes? Is there a fixed human nature that would be corrupted by enhancement technologies? If the aim of enhancement technologies is to produce more perfect humans, which conception of perfection is relevant to this aim? In what ways do attitudes toward human enhancement vary across cultures? Students will build their own research projects around issues such as the current state of the human genome project and the proper role of the scientist in the pursuit of genetic knowledge; the histories of plastic surgery, tattooing, body piercing and other artistic forms of bodily enhancement; and cross-cultural differences among attitudes toward human enhancement. Readings will include Shelley’s  Frankenstein , Hawthorne’s  The Birthmark , and Sandel’s  The Case Against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering .

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG774 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Latin American Modernities: Literature, Testimony, Film

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Juan Carlos Aguirre

Description

Latin American cultural production has a long tradition of reflecting closely on the historical processes shaping the region's politics. This course, which culminates in a final research paper, will guide students in examining some of Latin America's most significant social, political, historical, and cultural debates as they emerge in its literary and cinematic output since the mid-twentieth century. Coursework will guide students in investigating and reflecting critically on themes that recur frequently in late twentieth and early twenty-first century Latin American film and writing: colonialism; nationalism; ethnicity; dictatorship; revolution; modernity; globalization; and, of course, the region’s frequently ambivalent relationship to the United States. This course emphasizes a research methodology that is intertextual, interdisciplinary, intersubjective, and multicultural. Readings will include texts by Rosario Castellanos, J.L. Borges, César Aira, Zoé Valdés, Elena Poniatowska, Roberto Bolaño, and Reinaldo Arenas. In addition to contributing actively to class discussions each week, students will compose a research proposal, a critical annotated bibliography, and give periodic presentations on the state of their research.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1059 Lib Arts
SCI
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Disease and Civilization

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Gene Cittadino

Description


Notes

Section 002 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1636 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

The Political Economy of Development

4 units Tue Thu
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Description

Why did Asian countries become economic tigers while African nations saw their economies shrink? This course provides an introduction to the political economy of international development in order to explore the historical origins of the uneven geographies of wealth we see today. The course draws primarily on scholarship from the fields of political economy, geography, anthropology, development studies, and history. In Part 1, we begin by contrasting the dominant metrics used today to measure the  object  of development. Part 2 illuminates the key actors, institutions, and discourses of Development, through tracing the history of the Bretton Woods project, in relation to the history of capitalist development. Part 3 analyzes regional trajectories of socio-spatial change in theory and history through detailed case studies of Africa and East Asia. Finally, Part 4 examines key themes in contemporary development studies, including: environment, gender, and cities. Possible readings may include William Easterly, Amartya Sen, and Stuart Hall.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1865 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Times of Trauma

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Judith Greenberg

Description

The shock of trauma can freeze a moment. Time can seem elongated or detached. But then, belatedly, a traumatic event can hauntingly return and feel present. How does trauma fracture narrative continuity and a cohesive sense of time? How can it collapse distinctions among past, present and future? This course will explore theories about the nature of time and the coherence or fragmentation of Self. It will consider how traumas are documented, narrated, and passed on individually and in art, memorials, and performance. Readings may include St. Augustine's  Confessions  (Book 11), Marcel Proust  Swann's Way , Virginia Woolf's  Between the Acts , W. B. Sebald's Austerlitz, Art Spiegelman's  Maus , Tim O'Brien's  The Things They Carried , Marguerite Duras'  The War , Patrick Modiano's  Dora Bruder , Saidiya Harman's  Lose Your Mother  and  The Melancholy of Race  by Anne Anlin Cheng.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1115 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Creative Arts in the Helping Professions

4 units Thu
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Maria Hodermarska

Description

This arts workshop is a survey course in the creative arts therapies with particular focus on dance, music, art and drama therapy. The workshop provides a strong introduction to the theory and practice of the creative arts therapies. We consider applications of the creative arts therapies across the lifespan and different clinical populations and as clinical intervention to promote social justice. The course is taught by a working clinician and includes lectures from other working creative arts therapists. For students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in the creative arts therapies and for artists interested in applied arts and community-engaged arts practice. Textbook:  Expressive Therapies.  

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1369 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Japan and the Discovery of Interiority

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Nina Cornyetz

Description

The process of modernization in Western Europe spanned hundreds of years, from its nascent origins in the Renaissance, through the Enlightenment, into the twentieth century. In Japan this same process was collapsed into a few short decades around the turn of the nineteenth century. We will examine the shift from a premodern to a modern system of subjectivity and perspective in language, literature, and the performing arts. We will ask: What was the impact of Western imperialism, science, art, gender and sexual politics on Japanese language, literature and film? What were the internal conditions that made Japan ready for modernization? How did premodern conventions create a modernity in Japan different from Western models? What resisted modernization, and why? Our texts will include literature  The Miner  (Sôseki),  In Praise of Shadows  (Tanizaki), Ankoku butô dance, and secondary sources on history, language, and society, including Karatani,  Origins of Modern Japanese Literature .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9151 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Myths, Icons, and Invented Traditions: A Cultural History of Latin America

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. Mitos, íconos y tradiciones inventadas is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course will be structured in seven topics; each topic will be covered in two weeks. During these four classes, students will be exposed to different kinds of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and live concerts.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9550 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

TEL AVIV: Ancient Israel History and Archaeology: Travelers, Collectors, and Antiquities Robbers

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. The story of the archaeological discipline in the Land of Israel is strongly tied with the major developments that the region has undergone in the last two centuries. This course offers an overview of the history of archaeology in Palestine since the appearance of the first European travelers and missionaries in the mid-19th century, along the vibrant interest of collectors, forgers and robbers in the Promised Land, through the appearance of the first scientific excavations, the rise of the American biblical archaeology and its influence on local Israeli research. Special attention will be given to the way the newly born Israeli archaeology helped to establish the Zionist identity that wished to pass over two thousand years of Diaspora history; the methods by which the nascent Israeli archaeology connected new-comers to the land of the patriarchs and the manner by which Israeli scholars served state interests in the creation of the national Zionist ethos. The aftermath of the Six Days War and the increasing tension between the Bible and archaeology will be discussed in light of the intense debate over the historicity of the Exodus story, Joshua's conquests and the United Kingdom of David and Solomon. Finally, at the turn of the millennium, post-modern archaeology presented a new pluralistic view of the past. This multi-vocal framework will be used as a background for discussing the archaeology of otherness and minorities in 21st century Israel.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9250 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: Immigration

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9402 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

PRAGUE: Civil Resistance in Central and Eastern Europe

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. Civil resistance is not the same as opting out of society or having views that go against the grain. It is fundamentally about deciding not to conform with repressive regimes. It is also about choosing a mode of action that brings with it personal dangers even when, as is usual, it advocates non-violence. This course examines the nature and significance of civil resistance in Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th century. In studying resistance literature (including poetry and song), art and film, we will draw on ideas and arguments from the disciplines of history, political science, literature, art criticism, film studies and psychology.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1041 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing About Music: Stage and Floor

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Ben Ratliff

Description

In writing about music—any music at all—writers look either toward the stage or the floor. “Stage” writing might mean describing what’s on the score paper, or what comes out of the instruments on the bandstand. “Floor” writing might mean interpreting music through the desires and interests of the audience, and understanding the generative, identity-shaping culture that forms around any kind of song. Most great music-writing achieves a mixture of both; this course considers the virtues of each. Our readings will come from a hundred years of critical or clarifying writing on hiphop, jazz, rock, the classical tradition, electronic music, and beyond; here and there, some maverick musicology, eulogies, memoirs, and fiction. They will provoke basic questions about why we make music and why we respond to it, and establish—if it needed establishing—that music criticism is a literary endeavor with its own traditions of style and strategy. Three essays are required, as well as reactions to assigned texts, and to music that the students seek out and experience. Texts include those by Amiri Baraka, Whitney Balliett, Nik Cohn, Alec Wilder, Greg Tate, Ellen Willis, Albert Murray, Ciaran Carson, Christopher Small, Virgil Thomson, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, George Bernard Shaw, Ralph Ellison, Marcel Proust, John Darnielle, Marianna Ritchey, Geeta Dayal.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

IDSEM-UG1826 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

(Dis)Placed Urban Histories

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Rebecca Amato

Description

Neighborhood change comes in many varieties. Mid-twentieth century urban renewal in U.S. cities brought bulldozers and tower-in-the-park housing developments to dozens of poor neighborhoods considered ripe for revision. Early-twenty-first century gentrification, meanwhile, has brought high-end commerce and affluence to areas once occupied by low-income and working class communities. In the Melrose section of the South Bronx, a series of changes have influenced the streetscapes and lives of residents. Rampant arson in the 1970s and 1980s destroyed acres of the neighborhood, for example, while migrants from Puerto Rico and immigrants from the Dominican Republic, West Africa, and Bangladesh, among others, settled in the remaining homes of Melrose to build new lives in a new city. Most recently, federal dollars have been earmarked for Melrose’s reconstruction and redevelopment. This course, offered in partnership with the Bronx-based community empowerment organization WHEDCo, invites students to become activist historians whose objective is to learn what histories are at risk of being silenced or displaced as the South Bronx changes. Students will conduct archival and secondary research; produce collaborative oral histories with neighborhood residents and business owners; and meet with activists who are working to protect the interests of the current community of Melrose. The course will culminate in an on-line archive and a physical, history-based exhibit to be co-produced with neighborhood residents and displayed in a publicly accessible, outdoor park. Readings may include Jonathan Mahler’s  Ladies and Gentlemen the Bronx is Burning  and Jill Jonnes’s  South Bronx Rising .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/private-lesson-proposal.html Description: Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Private Lesson Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

INDIV-GG2925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/tutorial-proposal.html Description: Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Writing Long Fiction," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Tutorial Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: December 1. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

FIRST-UG701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Aesthetics in Context

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Christopher Trogan

Description

Philosophical aesthetics is naturally concerned with problems pertaining to the arts in general, but there are issues that must also be examined within the context of the particular arts. This course will begin with an examination of broad issues in aesthetics: What is art? What is beauty? What is the sublime? Is there such a thing as “good taste?” We will then consider particular issues within the context of painting, photography, film, architecture, music, literature, and the popular arts (specifically popular music, television, and video games). Some questions posed will be the following: What does it mean for a painting to be “about” or to “express” something? How should we think of photography—as a means by which we can actually see things and people in situations that no longer exist or as simply a means of registering the world? What is it about film that gives the medium its peculiar illusion-making power? Can architecture ever be considered a “pure” art form? What exactly is music? Does it represent and express in the same way as other art forms? What is literature? Do the literary arts have a special relationship to the arousal of emotion? What value is there in the popular arts and what ethical issues arise along with them? Readings will be drawn from Benjamin, Danto, Eco, Gombrich, Greenberg, Heidegger, Kant, Kivy, Langer, Nehamas, Plato, Scruton, and others. In addition to contributing regularly and actively to class discussions and activities, students will be required to compose frequent responses and reflections, write two formal essays (4-5 pages each), present a research proposal, and complete a final research paper (8-10 pages).

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

SASEM-UG9403 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

PRAGUE: Central European Film

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroad of ideas and ideologies as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian systems. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath, showing moral dilemmas of individuals and nations under the Nazi regime as well as revealing the bitter truth of the Stalinist years.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1823 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

In with the Old, Out with the New: Debates on "Tradition" in Western Music

4 units Mon Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Kwami Coleman

Description

Contests between stalwart custodians of “tradition” and rebels searching for new, untested modes of expression pervade Western music history. This course surveys some of the most contentious debates on music’s past, present, and future waged between music theorists, critics, artists, and audiences, spanning the last five hundred years. Our focus is on the seemingly inevitable tension between what music is, what it should be, and what it can be. Starting with the Greek philosophers of antiquity, we explore debates on the music of Claudio Monteverdi, Ludwig van Beethoven, Richard Wagner, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, John Cage, Bob Dylan, and The Slits. We also examine the backlash against and subsequent defense of styles like jazz, rock and roll, punk rock, and rap. Our goal is to better understand how culture is “made” ​precisely ​during ​these ​moments of charged debate, where a particular music’s perceived merits​ or transgressions serve as the pretext for larger ​often controversial ideological issues. Art, in this sense, becomes a platform by which to observe how competing aesthetic value​ systems​ reveal deep social and cultural rifts. This class meets twice a week. Our first session is devoted to scrutinizing and discussing primary sources​:​ letters, newspaper and magazine articles, journal entries, sound recordings, and film. For our second session we read and discuss secondary sources by scholars, critics, and investigative journalists for context, using this new information as a way to think critically about the primary sources and our own aesthetic judgments. Debating music tradition and innovation, as we shall see, is a long-standing tradition in its own right.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1212 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

World Dance

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Kathryn Posin

Description

Dance reflects cultural heritage and is a key to understanding diverse societies. In this arts workshop, students explore dance as it appears on several continents. Dance can be seen as encoded forms of a society's religious, artistic, political, economic, and familial values. Readings cover issues of globalization, fusion and authenticity. Migration, missionaries, trade routes and the diaspora have led to the creation of new dance forms like "Bollywood" and "Tribal" that are a synthesis of earlier forms. Students are introduced to different dance forms through selected readings, rich collection of video footage and studio practice often lead by various guest artists. After a brief warm-up, the class learns simple steps, floor plans and rhythms from the music and dance cultures being studied. Students choose a dance form as their project and themselves become researchers, performers and creators of new forms.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1772 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

Music and Civic Culture: Ancient and Modern

4 units Mon Wed
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Bruce King

Description

This course examines the role of music theory and musical performance in the formation of community, actual and utopic. We will begin our study with the musical, mathematical, and mystical thought of Pythagoras and his followers in the short-lived utopian community of Croton: How is “the Music of the Spheres” a paradigm both for ethical action within the community and for the progress of the soul within the cosmos? From Croton, we will turn to debates about music and civic culture in fifth-century democratic Athens: What forms of music and poetry sustain and subvert citizens and states? Is there a particularly “democratic” form of music? (Readings from Aeschylus, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, and Aristotle.) From ancient Greece, we will then turn to the late-nineteenth century efforts of Wagner, partially inspired by Athenian tragedy, to create the “Total Work of Art” in his Ring cycle of music-dramas and in the festival at Bayreuth; we will also read Nietzsche’'s (and Adorno’'s) responses to Greek tragedy and to Wagner. Finally, we will consider some twentieth-century experiments in music and art, especially those associated with Fluxus and with New York City (e.g., John Cage, Steve Reich, La Monte Young, Yoko Ono, The Velvet Underground), in dialogue with our earlier readings.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

TEL AVIV: Sexualities of the Middle East: A Cultural History

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-TEL AVIV. Questions of sexuality are central to the public debate on the Middle East. Scholars, politicians and journalists are engaged intensively with issues such as Islamic laws of modesty, persecution of LGBT Arab countries, and the separation of men and women within religious communities in Israel. To comprehend these questions, one must understand the sociological and cultural characteristics of contemporary Middle Eastern communities, but also the historical development of sexual attitudes in this area. In the present era, the Middle East is seen as a space of sexual repression and even "Sexual misery." However, this was not always the case. Since the late 18th century, European powers tightened their military, political and economic grip of the East – from Egypt to India. Europe has established its superiority over "The Orient" through the representation of this diverse territory as backward, fanatical and religious. But simultaneously, the East was an object of desire, including sexual desire. European travelers, scholars and intellectuals characterized the Orient as a space of unlimited sexual freedom. Ironically, while in the past, the West condemned the Muslim world’s alleged sexual licentiousness, the modern West today criticizes the Muslim repression of sexual freedoms. The course will tackle those questions from a historical perspective. Applying methodologies of queer theory, it will discuss the complex history of sexuality in the Middle East and sketch the genealogy of Western attitudes towards both Arab and Jewish sexuality, with a focus on LGBTQ. Relying on theorists and historians like Michel Foucault, Khaled El-Rouayheb, Samar Habib, and Joseph Massad, we will explore the essential role that sexuality in general, and the queer issue in particular, plays in the contemporary politics of the region.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

TRAVL-UG1200 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Art of Travel

2 units
Steve Hutkins

Description

This online course provides an opportunity for students studying abroad to reflect, analytically and creatively, on their travel experiences. We examine the art created by travelers—travel literature, photography, paintings—and consider how traveling can itself be viewed as an art, with its own conventions, styles, traditions, and opportunities for innovation. All of the course activities are conducted on the class Web site: students blog about their responses to the readings and their own travels, post photos, and comment on each other’s posts. Enrollment is limited to students studying at one of NYU’s study abroad sites. Reading assignments are individualized for the city and country of each study-abroad site, but some readings are for the whole class: these may include selections from de Botton’s  The Art of Travel , Urry’s  The Tourist Gaze,  MacCannell’s  The Tourist , and Leed’s  The Mind of the Traveler . For more information, see the course website: travelstudies.org.

Notes

Permission of the instructor required (ssh1@nyu.edu). Enrollment is restricted to students studying abroad at an NYU site. Due to local restrictions on what are considered to be online courses, this course is not available to students studying at NYU London, NYU Madrid, or NYU Accra.

Type

Travel Courses (TRAVL-UG)

SASEM-UG9150 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

BUENOS AIRES: Tango and Mass Culture (in Spanish)

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BUENOS AIRES. This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primative art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primative and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

INDIV-UG9050 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

ACCRA: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-ACCRA. Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

IDSEM-UG1793 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Femininity, Postfeminism and Mass Media

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Moya Luckett

Description

Postfeminism is an ambiguous and often contradictory term whose very indeterminacy speaks to the difficulties in understanding contemporary relationships between feminism, femininity, citizenship and identity. Positioned simultaneously as a backlash against feminism, a testament to achieved gender equality, as a reclamation of traditional feminine values and a sign of female success, postfeminism’s significance is widely felt even as its specific meanings and cultural effects appear unclear. This class will examine postfeminism’s relationship to feminism and femininity, situating all three as historically and culturally significant manifestations of the female self. Closely linked to the development of neoliberalism with its emphasis on self-reliance, choice and privatization, postfeminism is largely a product of consumer culture and mass media that have particularly consequences for feminine identities and gender relations. This course will look at popular women’s media from the makeover show, to fashion magazines and blogs, chick films and television drama to explore how they manage tradition and promote a more privatized and commercial feminine self, negotiating the relationship between family responsibilities and more laissez faire ideas of female success and self-actualization.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1043 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Image: History of Mass Media II

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Stephen Duncombe

Description

In 1859 Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote of the new science and art of photography: “Every conceivable object of Nature and Art will soon scale off its surface for us. Men will hunt all curious, beautiful, grand objects, as they hunt the cattle in South America, for their skins and leave the carcasses as of little worth.” We now live in the world that Holmes could then only glimpse. In this course we will study the relationship between skin and carcass, surface and reality, through the history of oil painting, light, photography, films, and television. We will pay special attention to issues of representation, presentation, spectacle and celebrity. Texts may include works by Susan Sontag, John Berger, Sally Stein, Jacques Ranci'ere, Daniel Boorstin, Wolfgang Schivelbush, Joshua Gamson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Liz Ewen, Charles Baudelaire, Lizabeth Cohen, Lewis Hine, and Guy Debord as well as period films and television programs.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1250 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Creating a Magazine: A Multimedia Approach

4 units Wed
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Molly Kleiman

Description

This pair of collaborative courses will enact Gallatin’s multidisciplinary, self-directed approach to learning, as students explore the potential of magazines as catalysts, cultural barometers, alternative communities, and forums for debate and new ideas. Through the discussion of critical texts about the history of publication, the analysis of various historical and contemporary magazines, and the development of new publications, students will learn to communicate ideas through design, editorial, and medium-specific approaches; analyze and question the features of the codex, the page, and the screen; and play with how these features affect how we read and perceive art. In the advanced writing course, students will concentrate on writing and editing for multiple platforms. In the arts workshop, students will focus on print media and design. In addition, students in both classes will have the opportunity to commission and edit both written text and art works from one another. Class meets once per week, with sessions split between discussions with designated professor and collaborative lab sessions with both classes and both professors. Lab sessions will be devoted to the conception, development, and production of publications that will each include a 32-page print prototype and new media elements. Lab days will also enable students to meet with guest speakers from the worlds of publishing and design; and go on field trips to the offices of contemporary magazines and relevant institutions and archives.

Notes

Please note this course meets frequently with ARTS-UG 1653 so that students may conceive, develop, and produce print and new media publications together.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

FIRST-UG710 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Food Culture and Food Writing

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Scott Korb

Description

We love food and it haunts us. We indulge in it and abstain from it. It makes us sick and it heals us. We worry over where it comes from and serve it during our religious rituals. We pay a fortune for it and we give it away. Its preparation is a science and an art. With a major focus on crafting the research essay, this course asks students to consider the many, often contradictory, roles food has played, and continues to play, in culture. And through a process of writing, workshopping, and the all-important rewriting, students have their own hand in the kitchen of the essay writer. Readings require a consideration of a variety of food writing—from primary sources, cookbooks, newspapers, magazines, and journals—and include works by David Foster Wallace, John McPhee, Ruth Reichl, Chang-Rae Lee, Lily Wong, and Michael Pollan.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1614 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Architecture and Urban Design Lab II

6 units Tue
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM Fri
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Louise Harpman

Description

This advanced course engages students in the research and design processes most often found in architecture and urban design studio classes. Because this is an advanced course, previous design experience is recommended. The LAB looks broadly at contemporary challenges, including resource management, human and non-human habitation, as well as political and social pressures on the environment. As a project-based course, students work individually and in teams, combining original research to create relevant and compelling design proposals. Introductory design exercises prepare students for an intense focus on a current problem in an established or emerging urban environment. Students are expected to present their ideas through the use of diagrams, scale models, video, animations, and other forms of imaging. Thus, as they create and develop original design proposals, students experiment with a variety of techniques and forms of representation. Research skills and visual literacy will be prioritized. Authors may include Stephen Johnson, William McDonough, Richard Sennett, Geoff Manaugh, Ricky Burdett, Eric Klinenberg, James Corner, Peder Anker, Tyler Volk and others. Proficiency in Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop are required. Experience with Rhino and Sketchup are highly recommended.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG786 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Marriage in American Literature and Culture

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Nicole Zeftel

Description

Edith Wharton once proclaimed the only cure to being alone is to “make one’s center of life inside of one’s self.” Echoing Wharton’s sentiment, Kate Bolick’s recently published book  Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own , attempts to reclaim the term “spinster” as a powerful feminist identity. Simultaneously, Lori Gottlieb’s controversial article in the Atlantic, “Marry Him! The case for settling for Mr. Good Enough,” advocates for “settling” as the necessary anecdote to modern women’s sense of entitlement inherited from feminism. Beginning in the nineteenth century and moving into these competing contemporary voices, this course asks why American identity has become so intimately bound up with marriage. From mid-nineteenth century treatises on the dangers of bachelorhood to the Marriage Equality Act, from queer theory to the current proliferation of idyllic wedding scenes clustered together through hashtags—we will examine the construction of gender roles and the shifting meaning of marriage.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ELEC-GG2717 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Islam and Modernity: Re-thinking Tradition, Cosmopolitanism and Democracy

4 units Tue
4:55 PM - 7:35 PM
Ali Mirsepassi

Description

This graduate seminar will focus upon the broad question of how societies, predominantly influenced by Islamic traditions, might find a home in the modern world on their own terms. We will discuss the possibility of a critical re-thinking of certain modern conventional modes of thinking about modernity, secularism, and democracy. The class will examine notions of citizenship, religion, and globalization in societies that have been historically influenced by Islamic tradition and institutions. This will be done by way of interrogating the works of contemporary scholars of Islamic modernity, including Mohammed Arkoun, Abdullahi An-Na'im, Fatima Mernissi, Talal Asad, Saba Mahmood, and Aziz Al-Azmeh. We will explore questions that cut across the disciplines of history, anthropology, sociology, and law.

Notes

Same as MEIS-GA 1807. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (am128@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 002
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Rosalind Fredericks

Description

Students in this class will draft and complete the thesis proposal. They will learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit a final draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser. The instructor’s acceptance of the draft will count as official Gallatin approval but students must also submit their proposal using the appropriate form, which will then be emailed to the adviser and Seminar instructor for confirmation.

Notes

Prerequisite CORE-GG 2018, CORE-GG 2025, CORE-GG 2028 or CORE-GG 2029, or permission of the MA Program Director, Karen Hornick (karen.hornick@nyu.edu). Section 2 is for students who intend to complete a thesis drawing largely from research in the fields of the social sciences. Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Students may not take this class in their first semester and are strongly advised to take it after they have completed the Proseminar requirement. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 24th, in which all sections meet at Silver Center, Room 414.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units
Section 003
Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Bella Mirabella

Description

Students in this class will draft and complete the thesis proposal. They will learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit a final draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser. The instructor’s acceptance of the draft will count as official Gallatin approval but students must also submit their proposal using the appropriate form, which will then be emailed to the adviser and Seminar instructor for confirmation.

Notes

Prerequisite CORE-GG 2018, CORE-GG 2025, CORE-GG 2028 or CORE-GG 2029, or permission of the MA Program Director, Karen Hornick (karen.hornick@nyu.edu). Section 3 is for students who intend to complete an artistic thesis. Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Students may not take this class in their first semester and are strongly advised to take it after they have completed the Proseminar requirement. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 24th, in which all sections meet at Silver Center, Room 414.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

IDSEM-UG1905 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Designing for New Climates: Histories of Adaptation

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Peder Anker, Mitchell Joachim

Description

The course explores how designers have responded to environmental problems and climate change. It starts with turn of the century admirations for primitivism and ends with the cyber punks design­ing new environments online. Following the work of architects, artists, urban planners, graphic designers and fashionista, the course will review the historical evolution of attempts to “save the world” from our environmental crisis. Who were the key figures that first ignited the green design revolution and its ensuing agenda? The class will unpack texts by thinkers such as Patrick Geddes, Henry David Thoreau, Ebenezer Howard, Louis Sullivan, Buckminster Fuller, Jane Goodall, Annie Leonard, Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins, Walter Gropius, Herbert Beyer, Ian McHarg, and many more. The class will focus on various modernist design schemes for adapting to new warmer climates, and why these attempts often failed. We will also devote time to discuss topics such as building closed ecological systems, counterculture designs, cyber environments, sick building syndrome, biomimetics, eco-fashion, earth art, and other attempts to design with nature. The overall objective is twofold; to survey the larger historical context of ecological design and define specific contributions to the climate change debate. The students will be asked to design, develop and participate in a street project.

Notes

Section 002 for Environmental Studies Majors

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1866 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Poetry and the Politics of Decolonization

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Linn Cary Mehta

Description

The course looks at poets writing in the twentieth century and after whose work is concerned with liberation from colonial rule and, subsequently, with the formation of a post-colonial literary voice. Poetry in the period of decolonization deals with issues of national, racial, and gender identity, place and displacement, and freedom from linguistic and political oppression. We will read, among others, two leading poets of négritude, Aimé Césaire and Léopold Senghor, in relation to movements in Caribbean, African, and American literature including the Harlem Renaissance (Nicolas Guillén, Derek Walcott, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes); poets from the Indian Subcontinent and Middle East such as Tagore, Iqbal, Faiz and Darwish; Latin American poets including Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, and Octavio Paz; and English-language poets including W.B. Yeats, William Carlos Williams, and more contemporary movements in poetry. Using theory and historical background, we will look at the work of each poet comparatively in the context of international development and political change. The course offers an approach to globalization through literature; since this process has touched so much of the world, we are open to works from other literatures that students propose.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

SASEM-UG9400 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

PRAGUE: Modern Dissent in Central Europe: The Art of Defeat

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. Totalitarian ideologies which were used in European political discourse in the twentieth century to explain major historical changes have changed forever the relationship between the state and its citizens. The aspiration of the totalitarian state to acquire total control over individual lives through control of education, employment and health systems succeeded beyond anything perceived possible until then in any political regime after European Enlightenment. Nazism and Communism mobilized irrationally motivated mass support and won power in a very short time. Their success was partially based on a mass propaganda, using fear as primary instinctive argument against a picture of both external and internal enemies. The major focus of the course will be oriented towards topics trying to explain the reasons for mass support for totalitarian ideologies and states on the basis of individual psychology. We will examine psychological explanations of a selfvictimisation, role of a victim and a perpetrator, majority society response to mass human rights abuses and the abusive past. On this background a phenomenon of a political and cultural dissent will be introduced and discussed. The role of electronic mass media, antiglobalisation movements and global terrorism are discussed as possible modern vehicles of totalitarian tendencies and reactions against them.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9353 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

PARIS: What is Technology?

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE IN PARIS: Social transformation and technology cannot be theorized in isolation. The technological, mediological, and digital worlds constitute a part of a shared material culture with profound implications for human experience. In this course, attempt to develop a critical heuristic which maps the topoi of the socio-eco-techno system. Drawing on mediology, ethics, and the French school of the anthropology of techniques, we explore such topoi as a form of “deep” historical sediment and also to understand how our values are negotiated and transformed via our on-going rapport with the technological. Conducted in English.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1431 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Of Fire and Blood: Art-making, Culture and Mythology in Mexico

4 units Mon
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Jaime Arredondo

Description

A rich landscape of art and culture flourished in Mexico for thousands of years beginning with the Olmec civilization at around the second millennium before Christ. With the arrival of the Spaniards in 1519, a new hybrid culture resulted from the fusion of Iberian and Native American cultures. This Arts Workshop will examine the art, culture and mythology of Mesoamerica, combining it with hands on art making. It will move chronologically in the following manner: the Olmec culture; Teotihuacan, or the City of the Gods; the Toltecs of Tula, and Quetzalcoatl the “Feathered Serpent”; the hyper-religiosity of the Aztecs; and, lastly we will read almost the entire text of the Popol Vuh, the Mayan creation myth of the universe, a highly visual and almost hallucinatory document once pushed underground for centuries. Topics throughout the course will include: astrology/astronomy and calendrical dating; religion, shamanism, and ecstatic experience; mythology, and cosmological belief; human sacrifice, and finally beliefs dedicated to vampirism. It is beneficial that students have a cursory understanding of art making. Techniques such as collage, 3-D model making, drawing and painting, will be utilized as well as working from a live model. A final exhibition will be created to show students work to the NYU community.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

CORE-GG2401 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Proposal Seminar

2 units Tue
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM
Sara Murphy

Description

Students in this class will draft and complete the thesis proposal. They will learn about the structure and content of the thesis proposal as they: (1) consider ways of integrating their work and articulating a core problem; (2) discuss the conventions of scholarly discourse, documentation, and argumentation; and (3) formulate goals that are ambitious but also achievable in a reasonable amount of time and in accordance with the availability of resources. Multiple sections of this course will be offered for students in the Social Sciences and Professions, the Humanities, and the Arts. Please note: unlike other requirements in the thesis and defense sequence of classes, the Thesis Proposal Seminar is offered only once a year in the spring semester. The course will combine classroom instruction and affinity-group work as well as special events and activities. In some weeks the course sections will meet separately, in other weeks all sections will come together for plenary sessions that may include events and activities such as guest lectures, library visits, and human subjects research instruction. Possible texts will include The Craft of Research (Booth, Colomb, and Williams). To pass, students must submit a final draft of the thesis proposal that has been read and approved by the adviser. The instructor’s acceptance of the draft will count as official Gallatin approval but students must also submit their proposal using the appropriate form, which will then be emailed to the adviser and Seminar instructor for confirmation.

Notes

Prerequisite CORE-GG 2018, CORE-GG 2025, CORE-GG 2028 or CORE-GG 2029, or permission of the MA Program Director, Karen Hornick (karen.hornick@nyu.edu). Section 1 is for students who intend to complete a thesis drawing largely from research in the fields of the humanities. Pass/fail only. This 2-unit course is taken during the second semester of full-time study, or after completing 12 credits. This course is only offered in the Spring semester. Students may not take this class in their first semester and are strongly advised to take it after they have completed the Proseminar requirement. Please note that, throughout the semester, all sections of this course will occasionally meet together at the regular class time; this includes the first day of classes, Tuesday, January 24th, in which all sections meet at Silver Center, Room 414.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

FIRST-UG811 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Transfer Student Research Seminar: The Politics of Work

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Rosanne Kennedy

Description

Work—especially wage labor—has come to be assumed as a necessary and unavoidable orientation of modern adult life. Even more, we assume that work is intrinsic to our sense of identity and self-worth. Attached to modern understandings of work are implicit values and morals, specifically the work ethic that frames work as individualistic, merit-based, and belonging to the private sphere. However, recent political critiques have begun to (re) question the ways in which labor and spaces of work constitute (or exclude) us as social and political subjects. In this seminar we will consider work as not only connected and buttressed by the political sphere but as itself political. Our aim will be to examine the unquestioned values that inhere in our understanding of work as well the ways in which the organization of modern forms of work constitute us and organize us a political subjects. In doing so we will consider how labor relations produce and reproduce us as embodied and affective subjects that sustain or exclude different classes, genders, races and ages. We will begin by first examining classical understandings and critiques of the organization of work in the writings of John Locke, Adam Smith, Marx, and Max Weber. We will then turn to contemporary critiques of work including those that point to postwork imaginaries. What would it look and feel like to live in a postwork society? How would we reorganize our time? What creative projects might ensue? What conditions (a basic universal income?) would make such a society possible? Readings for this section of the course may include: Arendt, Foucault, Baudrillard, Barbara Ehrenreich, Aronowitz, Negri, Bloch, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Kathi Weeks.

Notes

Open to Gallatin transfer students only. Permission required. To register, please contact Gallatin’s Transfer Student Class Advisers (gallatin.transfers@nyu.edu).

Type

First-Year Program: Transfer Student Research Seminar (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1800 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing the Rationale

2 units Tue
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Kimberly Phillips-Fein, Eugene Vydrin

Description

In this class we will begin by discussing such questions as “what is my concentration?” and “what is the relationship between a concentration and a rationale or a colloquium?” Using these questions to explore not only your own process but also the nature of interdisciplinarity, individualized education, and the value of the liberal arts, we will spend the first half of the semester developing methods of interdisciplinary study, which includes the history of your topic and ideas, and applying them to your own concentration. We will spend the second half of the semester drafting, workshopping, revising, presenting, and completing your colloquium rationale and booklist. Students will work as a class, with guest speakers, in small groups, and individually with their advisers and with the professors, as detailed in the syllabus. This class is an opportunity to explore and engage actively with your interests and your thinking.

Notes

Pass/fail only. Open to Gallatin juniors and seniors who plan to take their colloquium between Fall 2017 and Spring 2018.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1440 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Sissle, Blake and the Minstrel Tradition

2 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This course will explore the conflicting ideologies apparent in the works of Noble Sissle and James Hubert “Eubie” Blake. Famed for such hit musicals as “Shuffle Along” and “Chocolate Dandies,” Sissle and Blake formed one of the most successful musical theatre collaborations of the 1920’s. Their work draws strongly on the minstrel tradition in African American theatre, and attempts to subvert many of its conventions. It may be argued that their commercial success had the opposite effect, and served to update and modernize the very theatre conventions they sought to destroy. We will examine the effect of Sissle and Blake’s oeuvre on musical theatre in general and African American musicals in particular. Readings may include  Black Musical Theatre: From Coontown to Dreamgirls  by Allen Woll,  Black Drama  by Loften Mitchell, with excerpts from  Terrible Honesty  by Mary Douglas,  Blacks in Blackface  by Henry T. Sampson,  Reminiscing with Sissle and Blake  by Robert Kimball, and essays by W.E.B. DuBois and Alain Locke. Archival sound and film footage will be utilized along with such works as Spike Lee’s film  Bamboozled .

Notes

Course meets during the last seven weeks only, First Class: March 24; Last Class: May 5.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG781 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: The Politics of Prison: The History of Mass Incarceration

4 units Mon Wed
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
David Parsons

Description

What are the historical roots of mass incarceration in the United States? This course will trace the evolution of law enforcement and prison policies through the post WWII era, when the growth of American suburbs, along with rising fears of radicalism and urban violence, shifted the nation's focus from a war on poverty to new wars on crime and drugs. From the Zoot Suit Riots to the Battle in Seattle, from the Weather Underground to Black Lives Matter, we'll investigate the intersection of race, class, and social policy driving this phenomenon. Through a series of readings and research assignments, we will explore the social and political history of the past several decades, while honing our skills as researchers and writers. Primary readings will include Bryan Burrough's  Days of Rage: America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence , Heather Ann Thompson's  Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy , Damien Echols'  Life After Death , Angela Davis'  Are Prisons Obsolete?  and Elizabeth Hinton's  From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America .

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG9356 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Art’s Role in Race, Empire, and Universalism

4 units
Todd Porterfield

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE IN PARIS: This seminar begins with the conviction that the arc of modern history for both the U.S. and France has had a similar form. Both countries’s Enlightenment ideals of stunning potential, as found in  The Declaration of Independence  and  The Declaration of the Rights of Man  [sic], have often been ballyhooed and ignored, actualized and subverted. At the same time, we have remarked that the specificity of the ambivalent French entanglement with universalism, race, and empire is too rarely understood in the so-called New World. Our focus will be directed to art that in all its manifestations has had a critical role in this dynamic. It has been and continues to be deeply imbricated in the contradictory and reinforcing projects of universalism, race, and empire. But how exactly? What roles have objects played? This is the subject that the seminar will investigate. How have they functioned as symptoms, vectors, or agents in France and in dialogue with sites of French artistic and political ambitions and claims, including New France and Louisiana; the Caribbean; Egypt, North and West Africa; Tahiti and Viet Nam? And what has been their role when it comes to stateless people? Readings and discussions will consider fine art such as painting, drawing, prints, and sculpture, as well as other material objects and products of human and natural manufacture, such as books, the sea, obelisks, shells, textiles, makeup, and clothing.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

WRTNG-UG1019 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Basics and the Bold: Fundamentals of Editing Fiction and Creative Nonfiction

4 units Mon
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Barbara Jones

Description

Book editors and agents find that a great variety of submissions (including novels, short story collections, memoir and narrative nonfiction) require precisely the same kinds of editorial attention. Learning to identify and attend to these ubiquitous weaknesses in concept, narrative and prose can lift a manuscript from the “no” pile to enthusiastic acceptance and, later, from lackluster publication to strong word of mouth and review attention. This class will focus on two kinds of editing that can address those frequent, genre-crossing manuscript problems: the bold—identifying and troubleshooting the bigger conceptual and structural problems, including the young writer’s frequent habit of not being bold at all; and the basics—sweating the small stuff by learning and using the tricks of an editor’s trade. Readings will include works by writers such as Susan Minot, J.D. Vance, Celeste Ng, Marlon James and others (models of successful basics and boldness), and student writings. Students will be expected to: 1) bring in one story, chapter of a novel, piece of memoir or narrative nonfiction that they have written, 2) edit (including a line edit and an editorial letter) and 3) revise their own piece of writing in response to editorial feedback from the class.

Type

Advanced Writing Courses (WRTNG-UG)

SASEM-UG9401 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

PRAGUE: Kafka and His Contexts

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PRAGUE. "A book must be an ax for the frozen sea in us," wrote Franz Kafka (1883-1924), one of the best known but least understood authors of our times. In this course, we will break some of the clichés which are stuck to Kafka's life and work and dive into the fascinating, intricate and profoundly humorous world of his thoughts and emotions. In Prague, the city that determined and held Kafka in its "claws", we will trace the possible sources of the writer's private obsessions which became the general characteristics of modern men: The sense of isolation, the anxiety, the self-irony, the sense of responsibility and guilt, the quest for freedom, the struggle of an individual against the system. We will read selected works of Kafka, but also Meyrink - the author of Prague ghetto - and Milan Kundera. This course aims to bring the students to a point from which they can find their own genuine and intimate understanding of Kafka's writing.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1572 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Writing for Television II

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Imani Douglas

Description

This workshop focuses on the writer as an individual in the often daunting, sometimes humbling "collaborative" world of TV writing. In this workshop, we work on capturing the voices, rhythm, and style of varied classic TV hits, while executing class writing assignments. Students test their discipline, motivation, and ingenuity as they complete their very own "spec script" of a show of their choice, presently on the air. Readings may include  How to Write For Television  by Madeline Dimaggio,  The Sitcom Career Book  by Mary Lou Belli and Phil Ramuno, and selections from  Story  by Robert McKee and  How to Write a Movie in 21 Days  by Viki King. Students are required to work in Final Draft software for class projects.

Notes

This course is open to students with a serious interest in the craft of television. This writing-intensive workshop is modeled on the industry, requiring strict adherence to deadlines and mandatory attendance.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1439 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

James Reese Europe and American Music

units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Michael Dinwiddie

Description

This course will examine the impact of James Reese Europe (1880-1919) on the development of American music in the early twentieth century. An innovative musician and conductor, Europe organized and conducted the first jazz concerts at Carnegie Hall (1912-1914), founded an African American music school, and served as a collaborator with Irene and Vernon Castle, who made social dancing a world-wide rage. During World War I, James Reese Europe led the all-black “Hellfighters” 15th Infantry Band, which performed throughout France and offered Europeans their first exposure to ‘le jazz hot.’ Readings may include  A Life in Ragtime: A Biography of James Reese Europe  by Reid Badger; excerpts from  The Unknown Soldiers: African-American Troops in World War I  by Arthur E. Barbeau and Florette Henri;  From Harlem to the Rhine  by Arthur W. Little;  Black Manhattan  by James Weldon Johnson; and  They All Played Ragtime  by Rudi Blesh and Harriet Janis. Sound and film recordings will also be utilized.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 27; Last Class: March 10.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1925 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Tutorial

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/tutorial-proposal.html Description: Tutorials are small groups of two to five students working closely with a faculty member on a common topic, project, or skill. Tutorials are usually student-generated projects and like independent studies, ideas for tutorials typically follow from questions raised in a particular course. Students may collaborate on creative projects as well, and some titles of recent tutorials include "Creating a Magazine," "Dante's Literary and Historical Background," and "Environmental Design." Tutorials are graded courses, and students work together with the instructor to formulate the structure of the tutorial, the details of which are described in the tutorial proposal and submitted to the Gallatin School for approval. The tutorial group meets regularly throughout the semester, and students follow a common syllabus: all participants complete the same readings, write papers on similar topics, etc. Students in the same tutorial must register for the same number of credits. Credit is determined by the amount of work (readings and other types of assignments) and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Tutorials range from 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits: a 4-credit tutorial requires at least fourteen contact hours per term between the teacher and students.

Notes

Tutorial Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: December 1. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

INDIV-GG2801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Internship

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/internship-proposal.html Description: Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between their academic interests and related industries, and between academic theory and practical experience. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own internships as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship placement site, students are expected to attend two workshops; submit journal reflections about their internship experiences; write a mid-semester progress report describing the status of the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Internship Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship for the first time are required to attend two workshops: Workshop I: Thursday, February 2, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, February 9, 12:30-1:30pm; Workshop II: Thursday, March 23, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, March 30, 12:30-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

IDSEM-UG1925 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Food and Nature in Cities

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Jacob Remes

Description

What is the proper place of nature and agriculture in cities? How do cities shape nature, and vice versa? Where do—and where should—city-dwellers get their food? “Concrete jungles” (as opposed to “real” ones) often seem to be purely human-built, unnatural places where things are made and consumed, not grown. But the place of nature in cities, and our relationship to it, has long been contested. When we look at food in relationship to urban centers, we end up seeing far beyond the questions of what we eat and where we get it. The proper place of nature in cities is at the heart of many contemporary debates over urban policy, including food and agriculture, land use, disaster policy, and immunization. In this class, we will think historically and critically about these debates both in the past and in contemporary cities, focusing, though not exclusively, on North America, especially New York. Readings will include William Cronon, Ted Steinberg, Catherine McNeur, Katherine Leonard Turner, and others.

Notes

Section 002 for Environmental Studies majors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1639 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or EARLY
SP 2017

Witch, Heroine, Saint: Joan of Arc and Her World

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Andrew Romig

Description

In May 1431, Joan of Arc, the Maid of Orléans, was burned at the stake as a heretic and a witch by an English partisan court after the French nobility had betrayed her. An illiterate peasant girl just sixteen years of age, she had led the French back from the brink of defeat and saved the French monarchy from ruin. Yet in death, she would gain further power still as a martyr and symbol of indomitable French will and resistance. In this seminar, we will study Joan’s complex historical moment and her place within the long history of medieval women, Christian mysticism, and religious fanaticism. We will trace the stories of her appearance and military success, attempt to hear her voice in the extant transcript of her heresy trial, analyze contrasting French and English narratives about her life, and explore how she became the national heroine, patron saint, and political symbol that she is today. Texts will include Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, Catherine of Siena’s Dialogues and Letters, Thomas of Cantimpré’s Life of Christina the Astonishing, and Shakespeare’s I Henry VI. We will also analyze and discuss modern renditions of the Joan of Arc story by such diverse artists as Mark Twain, George Bernard Shaw, Bertolt Brecht, Carl Theodor Dreyer, and Luc Besson.

Notes

Same as HIST-UA 569

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9354 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Babel

4 units
Todd Porterfield

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-PARIS. How might we examine the myth of Babel to test assumptions about belonging and separateness? The construction of the Tower and its destruction by God, who then covered the earth with uncomprehending multitudes, would seem to be a story of uniformity, ambition, and then essential difference, of architecture, power, identity, language, and geographic spread. For thousands of years and from the Bible to the Early Modern to today, it seems to haunts us in architectural and imperial ambitions, in film and mass media, in high and contemporary art, in dystopian nightmares about globalization, in novels of authoritarian repression and novellas of spell-binding imaginings of freedom and connectedness. In this seminar we will analyze many of its figurations in Biblical and archaeological scholarship, literature, art and architectural history, film and visual studies, linguistics, philosophy, politics, and history. The subject leaves few alternatives but to broach the culture, politics, and philosophy of living together, and so we will explore some possible alternatives in peace and hospitality, in translation and in embracing the incompetence of language. Amongst the authors encountered, there will be Borges, Derrida, Gideon, Goethe, Huntington, Kafka, Kant, Mirzoeff, and Wordsworth.

Notes

Same as IDSEM-UG 1869. Students who have taken IDSEM-UG 1869 (Babel) will not receive credit for IDSEM-UG 9354. Course is not repeatable.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1858 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Female Body in Contemporary Visual Culture

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Elena Wang

Description

In light of pressing popular debates over the valuing of female bodies and female beauty in social and political life, this course explores the dominant visual paradigms that shape female embodiment today. Taking the glamorous figure of the runway model as our point of departure, we will put into dialogue the material and representational dimensions of model bodies, considering the different kinds of labor entailed by the female body’s insistent commodification, and exploring its psychosocial costs. Critical and feminist literature will help us read recent films, ethnographies and journalistic accounts of female body work, while weekly current events presentations enrich our discussions. Texts include Iris Marion Young’s  On Female Body Experience ,   Zygmunt Bauman’s  Wasted Lives , and Freud’s seminal 1917 essay, “Mourning and Melancholia.”

Notes

formerly titled "Couture Culture: Sexual Politics on the Runway"

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-GG2701 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Private Lesson

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/private-lesson-proposal.html Description: Private lessons provide students with the opportunity to earn academic credit for their studies at performing or visual arts studios in the New York area. These studies are meant to supplement work begun in regularly scheduled classes at NYU or to provide students with the opportunity to study areas for which comparable courses at the University are unavailable to Gallatin students. Private lessons may be taken in voice, music, dance, acting, and the visual arts, with teachers or studios of their choice—as long as they have met with the approval of the Gallatin faculty. Credit for private lessons is determined by the number of instruction hours per semester. Students taking private lessons are required to submit a journal and final assessment paper to the faculty adviser. Unlike private lessons offered elsewhere in the University, Gallatin's private lessons are arranged and paid for by the student. The student is responsible for full payment to the studio or instructor for the cost of the private lessons, as well as to NYU, for the tuition expenses incurred by the number of private lessons course credits.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Private Lesson Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu).

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

SASEM-UG9201 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

FLORENCE: Topics in 19th Century Literature: Italy and Italians in English Literature from the Romantics to Modernism

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-FLORENCE. Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist writers in both Britain and the United States were fascinated by Italy. The "Italy and Italians" of the title refers not only to images and characters in the works of the British and American authors we will be reading but also to their affinities with Italian literature. Recurring themes in the course will be history and its uses in literature, gender and sexuality, democracy and aristocracy, language and power, and religion as an instrument of sexual repression.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

CORE-GG2028 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Proseminar: The Past in the Present: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

4 units Wed
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Eugene Vydrin

Description

The past is… An enabling tradition? A stifling burden? A repetition compulsion? A revolutionary imperative? Each of these by turns or all at once, the idea of the past figures centrally in the work of thinkers across disciplines and mediums: philosophers and psychologists, historians and social theorists, poets, painters, and filmmakers. This proseminar, aimed at the needs and interests of students embarking upon the Gallatin MA, offers an introduction to a series of influential theories and methods in the humanities and social sciences by exploring and comparing their conceptions of the past and its effects on the present and the future. The past is an unquiet ghost haunting theoretical texts as well as the literary and visual artworks they illuminate and that have inspired them. With the presence of the past as our guiding thread, we will read and closely analyze classic and modern texts (in fields ranging from philosophy and cultural theory to literature, painting, and film, to anthropology, sociology, and historiography); map major theoretical and political positions within these texts and artworks; develop a shared critical vocabulary; and formulate the urgent and intractable questions that motivate these texts and provoke our responses to them. Our texts may include essays and books by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Woolf, Stein, Du Bois, Benjamin, Césaire, Foucault, Said, Gilroy, and Morrison. Students will play a major role in navigating our readings, steering our discussions, and choosing the topics we address. In addition to writing short responses and a midterm paper, students will conduct a critical research project on a relevant topic of their own choosing that will culminate in a 15-20 page final paper.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

CORE-GG2999 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Thesis Advisement

1 units

Description

Students who do not defend the thesis successfully or have not completed the thesis during the semester in which they are registered for Master's Thesis and Defense, CORE-GG 2335, or Master's Thesis II, CORE-GG 2403, are required to register for Thesis Advisement each semester (including the summer, for students graduating in September) until the thesis is defended. Credits earned through Thesis Advisement are not included in the 40-credit requirement for the master's degree. The special tuition rate for Thesis Advisement is $400.00 plus a non-refundable registration and services fee.

Notes

To register, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Graduate Core (CORE-GG)

ARTS-UG1577 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Contemporary U.S. Playwriting

4 units Fri
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Kristoffer Diaz

Description

This arts workshop combines the academic study of some of the most important recent dramatic works in the United States with an interdisciplinary approach to the artistic adventure of writing new short plays. Students will read work from ten prominent contemporary playwrights (among them Lynn Nottage, Annie Baker, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Rajiv Joseph, and Robert O'Hara), then respond with short dramatic pieces inspired by those texts. Significant focus will be placed on drawing connections with great books and concepts being discussed in students’ other coursework and how those texts may inform the plays we are reading. The class may include a trip to an Off-Broadway show and/or visits from some of the assigned playwrights. Additional readings may include non-play texts by Sarah Ruhl, Jose Rivera, and Anne Bogart.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

ELEC-GG2510 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Critic vs. Cliché

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Ben Ratliff

Description

“Cliches invite you not to think,” wrote the literary critic Christopher Ricks, “but you may always decline the invitation.” Cliches can be bad for language, thought, and action, in that they serve efficiency and an abstract idea of power, and lead the user away from the truth. But we all use them, and to avoid them entirely may be impossible. Which makes the work of the cultural critic, part of whose job is to locate and question them wherever they occur, that much trickier and deeper. In this advanced writing seminar, we will move toward a sophisticated relationship with the cliche. What is the difference between cliche and idiom, meme, hype, tradition, archetype? Where do they live and breed? What do they accomplish? If, as Adam Phillips says, “cliches are there to stop us being suspicious,” can they be much more than a writer’s bad habit--can they be used for bullying and societal oppression? We will read criticism which notices the use of cliches (or received wisdom) in culture, by Gerald Early, Hannah Arendt, Margo Jefferson, and others, as well as some fiction (Paul Beatty’s novel The Sellout) and satire; and writings on the subject of the cliche itself by critics, linguists, sociologists and others (Christopher Ricks, Orin Hargraves, George Orwell). Students will write critical essays in response to the readings, as well as to current cultural or social events, paying special attention to how cliches function in the subject itself and the discourse around it.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (bpr212@nyu.edu).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1918 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Truth in Narrative: Race and Slavery in the Atlantic World 1600-1900

4 units Fri
11:00 AM - 1:45 PM
Carolyn Arena

Description

This seminar investigates first-person narratives of slavery from the perspective of adventurers, novelists, former slaves, abolitionists, and slave owners from the early modern period (c1500-1900). Audiences from that period, and historians alike, have doubted some of these accounts as exaggerations. 17th-century dramas, like Aphra Behn's  Oroonoko  and John Smith's  History of Virginia , have been novelized or romanticized for commercial appeal, yet nevertheless contain undeniable truths about the experience of slavery. 18th- and 19th-century accounts from former slaves, such as Mary Prince and Olaudah Equiano, have been challenged as sensationalized by those in favor of slavery, who doubted that former slaves could become such eloquent writers, and suggested that white abolitionists had ghost-written them instead for their own political gain. This class will discuss how racism influenced these accusations, and how their central message of slavery's brutality can be confirmed, rather than rejected, using memoirs by slave-holders themselves. This course uses these sources to trace the trajectory of New World slavery from its origins in the Mediterranean, to the enslavement of both Native Americans and Africans shipped throughout the Atlantic, to the development of slavery as a racialized institution through colonial legal codes, and finally, to Abolition movements leading up to the American Civil War. The course will focus on the discussion of the aforementioned narratives plus other narratives and film adaptations like Solomon Northup's  Twelve Years a Slave , with short lectures contextualizing each work in colonial and international history.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1050 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Performing Stories: East Meets West

4 units Wed
2:00 PM - 4:45 PM
Lanny Harrison

Description

In this course we create characters inspired by history, memory, dreams and world lore through challenging exercises that fuse Eastern contemplative traditions and Western theatrical improvisation. Students learn how to access different aspects of themselves to enhance their own creative process and create a uniquely authentic theatre. Each session begins with vocal exercises and physical warm ups, based on Taoist exercises and Western dance techniques. Our character work starts with meditations and visualizations employing the Buddhist tradition of "mindfulness/awareness" practice, in which we place ourselves totally in the present moment. We work in solos, duos and groups, gradually adding costumes, props and music. Open to theater students, dancers, musicians, visual artists, writers, techies—all those interested in discovering their own source of deep invention. Readings include Chögyam Trungpa's  Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior and Dharma Art  (now titled True Perception), Louise Steinman's  The Knowing Body , Ethan Nichtern's  One City  and John Welwood's  Ordinary Magic  and Pema Chodron's  The Wisdom of No Escape .

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG784 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Museums and the Politics of Space

4 units Mon Wed
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Melissa Turoff

Description

The concepts of “cultural heritage” and “historic preservation” are capacious, including natural resources, man-made artifacts, monuments, folklore, myth, and tradition. Most importantly, these concepts connect the past, present and future within a coherent narrative. The construction of this narrative is itself an ideologically and politically charged process. This course explores how and where this process occurs. How does it manifest itself in the spaces of museums, archaeological digs, sacred spaces, and tourist destinations? And how do these sites shape communities or nations? This seminar traces how global imperial projects of preservation and plunder filled the museums of London, Paris, and Rome. We explore how museums become contested sites of postcolonial nation-building, historical reckoning, and as a means of integrating traumatic events into our historical consciousness. Combining insights from history, museum studies, architecture, and urbanism, we examine how “cultural heritage” and “historic preservation” relate to museums. In what ways can museums be understood as political spaces shaped by national, colonial, and postcolonial forces? How do colonial and postcolonial politics shape the processes of curation and “museumification?” We also visit museums in New York to discuss the power dynamics behind “museumification” in our own city. More informal writing assignments culminate in two formal research projects. The aim of assignments throughout the seminar is to hone critical thinking and writing skills, to disentangle concepts of “heritage,” and to explore how museums helped build civilizations, empires, and modern-day nations. Readings may include Sir Walter Scott, John Ruskin, Pierre Nora, Michel Foucault, Eric Hobsbawm, Benedict Anderson, David Harvey, Susan Crane, Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Nezar AlSayyad, and Alexander Stille.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

IDSEM-UG1867 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

Global Noodles: Silk Routes & Subway Connections

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Jack Tchen

Description

Is this just an excuse to eat lots of noodles. Yes, it is! This basic research course is immersive education in the most delicious, fully embodied sensate, and legal way possible. Along the way, you’ll learn about the secret ingredient to noodle making, the oldest noodle, Italian or Chinese?, and what Genghis Khan did for modernity. And yes this course is also historical and sopping in critical cultural theory, you can tell your parents, as a way to learn about cross-cultural communication challenges, intermingled spaces, and embodied knowledges and practices. We will examine the historical and ongoing impacts of the silk route latitudinal and longitudinal movements throughout Central Asia on the vernacular cultures of global cities, such as the migrant friendly neighborhoods New York City. Part of what is unarticulated yet implied by global cities is the compression of longue durees of times/spaces in one distinctive time/space. Besides slurping for mouth feel, understanding family broth recipes, and storytelling practices, we’ll be documenting, making, analyzing, and appreciating the worlds of noodle practices and conveying our collaborative findings using the latest in mapping apps. Readings and films will include: work by Chef Ken Hom,  The Silk Road: A New History of the World ,  Cuisine & Empire: Cooking in World History , essays from affect studies, and the use of CartoDB mapping software. Prerequisites – still loving  Tampopo  (1985) after three viewings, having comfy but stylish walking shoes, and purchasing two monthly Metro Cards.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 380 001. In order to register, students enroll in the lecture, IDSEM-UG 1867 001, and then select one of the recitations, IDSEM-UG 1867 002 or IDSEM-UG 1867 003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1855 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Creativity, Innovation, Entrepreneurship

4 units Mon
7:45 PM - 10:15 PM
Peter Rajsingh

Description

The terms creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship (CI&E) are routinely invoked in the 21st century. The goal of this class is to examine these concepts both individually and in the way they interrelate. How do we understand these terms? To what extent are CI&E stable, contestable, or how is one a precursor of the other? A business writer suggested that “creativity is the price of admission, but it’s innovation that pays the bills.” As values, how do CI&E generate value in business, as well as in life? Thinking analytically and practically about CI&E, we will explore images of the self, economic notions of the good life and of society implicit in different ways that CI&E get parsed. And we will examine the anatomy of start-ups as well as intrapreneurship — the fostering of an entrepreneurial internal culture, where the Gallatin model of individualized study might be considered a useful paradigm.

Notes

Open to Gallatin students only. All others require permission of the instructor (pr9@nyu.edu)

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1867 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

Global Noodles: Silk Routes & Subway Connections

4 units
Section 002
Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM

Description

Is this just an excuse to eat lots of noodles. Yes, it is! This basic research course is immersive education in the most delicious, fully embodied sensate, and legal way possible. Along the way, you’ll learn about the secret ingredient to noodle making, the oldest noodle, Italian or Chinese?, and what Genghis Khan did for modernity. And yes this course is also historical and sopping in critical cultural theory, you can tell your parents, as a way to learn about cross-cultural communication challenges, intermingled spaces, and embodied knowledges and practices. We will examine the historical and ongoing impacts of the silk route latitudinal and longitudinal movements throughout Central Asia on the vernacular cultures of global cities, such as the migrant friendly neighborhoods New York City. Part of what is unarticulated yet implied by global cities is the compression of longue durees of times/spaces in one distinctive time/space. Besides slurping for mouth feel, understanding family broth recipes, and storytelling practices, we’ll be documenting, making, analyzing, and appreciating the worlds of noodle practices and conveying our collaborative findings using the latest in mapping apps. Readings and films will include: work by Chef Ken Hom,  The Silk Road: A New History of the World ,  Cuisine & Empire: Cooking in World History , essays from affect studies, and the use of CartoDB mapping software. Prerequisites – still loving  Tampopo  (1985) after three viewings, having comfy but stylish walking shoes, and purchasing two monthly Metro Cards.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 380 002. In order to register, students enroll in the lecture, IDSEM-UG 1867 001, and then select one of the recitations, IDSEM-UG 1867 002 or IDSEM-UG 1867 003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1867 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
or GLOBAL
SP 2017

Global Noodles: Silk Routes & Subway Connections

4 units
Section 003
Thu
6:20 PM - 7:35 PM

Description

Is this just an excuse to eat lots of noodles. Yes, it is! This basic research course is immersive education in the most delicious, fully embodied sensate, and legal way possible. Along the way, you’ll learn about the secret ingredient to noodle making, the oldest noodle, Italian or Chinese?, and what Genghis Khan did for modernity. And yes this course is also historical and sopping in critical cultural theory, you can tell your parents, as a way to learn about cross-cultural communication challenges, intermingled spaces, and embodied knowledges and practices. We will examine the historical and ongoing impacts of the silk route latitudinal and longitudinal movements throughout Central Asia on the vernacular cultures of global cities, such as the migrant friendly neighborhoods New York City. Part of what is unarticulated yet implied by global cities is the compression of longue durees of times/spaces in one distinctive time/space. Besides slurping for mouth feel, understanding family broth recipes, and storytelling practices, we’ll be documenting, making, analyzing, and appreciating the worlds of noodle practices and conveying our collaborative findings using the latest in mapping apps. Readings and films will include: work by Chef Ken Hom,  The Silk Road: A New History of the World ,  Cuisine & Empire: Cooking in World History , essays from affect studies, and the use of CartoDB mapping software. Prerequisites – still loving  Tampopo  (1985) after three viewings, having comfy but stylish walking shoes, and purchasing two monthly Metro Cards.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 380 003. In order to register, students enroll in the lecture, IDSEM-UG 1867 001, and then select one of the recitations, IDSEM-UG 1867 002 or IDSEM-UG 1867 003.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1466 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

The Philosophy and Welfare Politics of Distributional Justice

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Justin Holt

Description

Are the outcomes of capitalist exchanges fair or unfair? Is capitalism supportive or detrimental to democratic virtues? Does the welfare state rectify the problems of capitalism or exacerbate them? John Rawls’ work  A Theory of Justice  has greatly shaped these considerations of the welfare state. His theory refined many of the debates concerning the fairness of capitalist economic outcomes and the effects capital accumulation has on democratic virtues. According to Rawls, the welfare state in some form was necessary for capitalism to have morally acceptable outcomes. But, critics of Rawls have called into question welfare state interventions, many finding them economically inefficient and detrimental to democratic virtues. Other critics have founds Rawls’ theory to be too limited in its impact, thereby supporting more extensive interventions into capital accumulation. In this course we will try to answer questions about the morality of capitalist accumulation by studying theoretical conceptions of Rawls’ work and the responses of his critics. The main texts of Rawls’ critics we will consider are Nozick’s  Distributive Justice  and Cohen's  Rescuing Justice and Equality . We will also discuss current welfare state policies such as basic income grants.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG9251 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: Art and War, 1914-2004

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. This 15 week course will take an in-depth yet wide-ranging look at an important but curiously neglected aspect of modern western visual culture. Within a broadly chronological structure, topics to be dealt with will include the following: the relationship between art and atrocity, and the attendant problem of the aestheticisation of horror; the crucial influence of photography and the growth of mass communications; the issue of censorship, both external and internal, and the related issue of the "limits of representation" (above all, in relation to the Holocaust and Hiroshima); the distinction between official and unofficial war art, and between art and propaganda, between art that endorses and even glorifies war and an art of protest; issues of gender and sexuality; questions of cultural memory and the memorialization process, and the representation of war in contemporary art practice. It will consist of a combination of informal lectures, student presentations, at least one gallery visit, and the occasional film showing.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1727 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
PREMOD
SP 2017

Plato's Apology

2 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Laura Slatkin

Description

‘Corrupting the youth’ of Athens? Virtue in action? Threat to the body politic? Model citizen? Plato’s Socrates presents a conundrum for ancient and modern thought. In his brilliant dialogue, the  Apology , Plato recreates Socrates’ defense of himself at his trial in 399 BCE for (among other things) ‘corrupting the youth’ of his city. The  Apology  sits at the intersection of law, politics, philosophy, religion, erotics, and pedagogy. In this course, we read the  Apology  closely, exploring it as philosophical reflection, courtroom oratory, literary text—and as gripping drama. Supplementary readings address: intellectual milieu, historical and political context, questions of genre.

Notes

Course meets during the first seven weeks only, First Class: January 24; Last Class: March 7. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1901 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Social Theory and Curatorial Practice

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Eugenia Kisin

Description

In contemporary art and media worlds, it seems as if everyone who makes choices about what to present to the public is called a curator. But what exactly is the work of curating? How do curators refine their capacities for judgment, storytelling, and display? How are these forms of expertise learned, and in what ways do they intersect with other forms of cultural production? Balancing critical and applied perspectives, this course investigates curatorial work as a site of cultural practice, a sphere of action and knowledge—above all, the “eye” or sense of critical taste—that is learned and performed in multiple contexts of display. Connecting curation to its etymological roots in “cure” and “care,” this course will also consider curating as a remedial practice that has changed over time in relation to globalized networks of the art market, professionalization, and the phenomenon of celebrity curators. Students will investigate curatorial intent and outcomes based on exhibition catalogs, reviews, and other forms of documentation. Students will also explore contemporary practices of curating within and beyond the space of the gallery through their own curatorial projects. Throughout the class, we will read theoretical texts by curators, social theorists, and artists, including Claire Bishop, Pierre Bourdieu, Andrea Fraser, Candice Hopkins, and Hans Ulrich Obrist.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

INDIV-UG1801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Internship

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/internship.html Description: Internships offer Gallatin students an opportunity to learn experientially at one of New York City's many social institutions, art and cultural organizations, community-based organizations, or corporations. Students gain first-hand work experience and develop skills and knowledge that will help them in pursuing employment after graduation. They also explore the relationship between their academic interests and related industries, and between academic theory and practical experience. Gallatin provides an extensive list of available internships; students may pursue their own internships as well. Internships are typically unpaid positions, although students in paid positions are permitted to receive credit. In addition to the weekly hours spent at the internship placement site, students are expected to attend two workshops; submit journal reflections about their internship experiences; write a mid-semester progress report describing the status of the internship; and write a final paper for the faculty adviser.

Notes

Pass/Fail only. Internship Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact Faith Stangler Lucine (fs1@nyu.edu). Students registering for an Internship for the first time are required to attend two workshops: Workshop I: Thursday, February 2, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, February 9, 12:30-1:30pm; Workshop II: Thursday, March 23, 12:30-1:30pm or Thursday, March 30, 12:30-1:30pm.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

ARTS-UG1595 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Young Women in the Prison System: #SayHerName

4 units Mon
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Piper Anderson

Description

Rates of detention amongst girls in the US continue to increase even as overall rates of incarceration amongst youth have steadily declined in the last decade. Yet, because girls represent a proportionally smaller population within the juvenile justice system fewer resources are allocated to address the underlying causes of incarceration and recidivism amongst young women ages 12-19. This course investigates the causes and consequences of incarceration amongst girls and women. In this course students, design and facilitate an arts and education program for incarcerated girls. What are the unique concerns presented by incarcerated female populations? What must we understand about the policing of gender and sexuality in order to meet the needs of incarcerated girls and women? What role does trauma play in the experiences of girls remitted to the juvenile justice system? What is the role of the arts in empowering incarcerated youth? Exploring these and other questions enables students to better understand the role of the Prison Industrial Complex in defining and policing gender roles and sexual minorities. Readings include Global Lockdown: Race, Gender, and the Prison-Industrial Complex by Julia Sudbury; Queer Injustice by Andrea Ritchie, and Girls Like Us by Rachel Lloyd.

Notes

This course requires 4-5 Saturday morning workshops in April and May at a secure detention facility. Formerly titled "Lyrics on Lockdown: Young Women in the Prison System." Offered previously as CLI-UG 1443. Students who have taken CLI-UG 1443 should not register for ARTS-UG 1595—the course is not repeatable.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

FIRST-UG780 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Poverty and Inequality

4 units Tue Thu
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Sahar Romani

Description

The commitment to end poverty is widespread from the United Nations to national governments, corporations to NGOs, activists to globally minded millennials. But why are people still poor and why does poverty endure? In this seminar, we will critically examine and interrogate dominant conceptualizations of poverty and inequality. In our study, we will draw connections to social relations, histories, and systems that perpetuate impoverishment and inequality. We will also investigate the strengths and limitations of dominant methodologies of “poverty action” such as philanthropy, aid, ethical consumerism, or NGO-based development. In this process we will reflect on our own aspirations of poverty action and social change. Throughout the course we will read scholarly texts and ethnographies as well as study cultural materials such as fiction, policy documents, and film. Students will develop research and writing skills through a range of assignments including group presentations, short essays, and a multi-step research essay. Readings may include Matthew Desmond, Branko Milanovic, Ananya Roy, and Jesmyn Ward.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

INDIV-UG1901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Independent Study

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/independentstudy.html Description: In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Independent Study Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: December 1. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-UG)

ARTS-UG1090 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Participatory Performance: Artists, Audiences, and Civic Engagement

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Kristin Horton, Leila Buck

Description

Application: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/dam/gallatin/documents/forms/Courseapp-ARTS-UG1090.pdf Description: Beginning from the premise that by its nature theater is inherently participatory, this arts workshop explores a wide spectrum of participatory/interactive performance with an emphasis on contemporary practices and their potential for civic engagement. Specific attention will be given to the relationships between artist, event and spectator-participant as well as forms of interactivity and the spectrum of engagement they provide. What does it mean to participate? How does participatory performance affect the role and process of the writer, director, designer, performer, and audience member? Who is in the audience? What are the ethical concerns of these evolving and increasingly popular practices? Throughout the course students will engage as creators as well as audience-participants as we examine these relationships and questions. We will investigate the work of artists and companies using participatory forms to explore such concepts as democracy, citizenship, and systems of privilege including Aaron Landsman ( City Council Meeting ), Dread Scott ( Dread Scott: Decision ), dog & pony dc, Epic Theatre Ensemble and others. The course will also address the issues raised by working cross-culturally and frameworks for artists to consider the political and philosophical implications of making work in, with, about and for diverse communities. Theoretical texts may include readings by Claire Bishop, Nicolas Bourriaud, Augusto Boal and others based on student research interests. The course culminates in an in-class sharing of short participatory performances-in-progress created by students individually or in groups based on intersections with their own research and practices.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

SASEM-UG9250 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: Seeing London's Architecture

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON. London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape. This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else.

Type

Global Programs (SASEM-UG)

FIRST-UG785 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Normativity and Media

4 units Mon Wed
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Kevin Gotkin

Description

What does it mean to act or be normal? In what ways do media determine how we imagine normalcy? In this course we will consider media as a broad category, including a range of technologies, objects, texts, and even collective feelings. We will discover normalcy as a fragile and curiously inconspicuous concept, exploring its development in U.S. America since the mid-19th century. We will consider the role of media in, for example, gay and lesbian activists’ campaign to depathologize homosexuality or how the charity telethon genre presented ideas of dis/ability to enormous audiences in the latter half of the 20th century. As we tour these cases and others, students will work independently to produce original research. In four essays, students will select media artifacts to study, reviewing appropriate literature and designing methods for examining an object’s capacity to enforce or dismantle ideas about “the normal.” As a writing-intensive journey, this course will train students in the skills required to render complicated thinking. Primary readings will include works by Langon Winner, Donna Haraway, Paul Preciado, Joseph Dumit, and Steven Epstein.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ARTS-UG1425 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Discovering Manhattan: Drawing and Painting in the Spirit of the Modern Art Pioneers

4 units Thu
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Barnaby Ruhe

Description

This workshop explores images of New York City as envisioned by various schools of modern art, including Ashcan, Bauhaus, Futurist, Dadaist, Pop, and High Tech, and by the artists of the modern period, including Sloan, Mondrian, Hopper, Marin, Brancusi, O'Keefe, Duchamp, Grooms, and Koons. While foraging in galleries, students create their own art works riffing on the masters; sketching in Times Square with the garrulous attitude of Reginald Marsh; drawing a skyscraper in an ecstatic John Marin breath; creating a Dadaist collage by rifling through bins with Arman and Duchamp. The workshop concludes with a collaborative mural project and a final paper analyzing various strategies of expression whereby modern artists discovered the meaning of Manhattan. Through a process of appropriation, imitation, and parody, students are thus encouraged to re-enact the process of "discovering Manhattan," to engage in a dialogue with the city, and thereby to discover their own artistic voices. Readings include E.B. White's ineffable  Here is New York , Al Ginsberg's outrageous "Howl," Robert Henri's  Art Spirit , as well as excerpts from Natalie Edgar's  The Club  (who met at the Cedar Tavern on 13th and University) anchored by Federico Garcia Lorca's Surrealist "Duende" from his “Poeta en Nueva York” lecture.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

INDIV-GG2901 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Independent Study

4 units

Description

Proposal Form: http://gallatin.nyu.edu/utilities/forms/independentstudy.html Description: In an independent study, students work one-on-one with a faculty member on a particular topic or creative project. Often the idea for an independent study arises in a course; for example, in a seminar on early 20th-century American history, a student may develop an interest in the Harlem Renaissance and ask the professor to supervise an independent study focused exclusively on this topic during the next semester. Students may also develop creative projects in areas such as music composition, filmmaking, or fiction writing. Independent studies are graded courses, the details of which are formulated by the student and his or her instructor; these specifics are described in the Independent Study proposal and submitted to the Dean's Office for approval. The student and instructor meet regularly throughout the semester to discuss the readings, the research, and the student's work. Credit is determined by the amount of work entailed in the study and should be comparable to that of a Gallatin classroom course. Generally, independent studies, like other courses, are 2 to 4 credits. Meeting hours correspond to course credits; a 4-credit independent study requires at least seven contact hours per term between the teacher and the student.

Notes

Independent Study Proposal form required. Proposal submission deadline: January 27. Upon approval, students will be assigned to a course section and given a registration permission number. For more information, please contact studentservices.gallatin@nyu.edu.

Type

Individualized Projects (INDIV-GG)

IDSEM-UG1859 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Modern Poetry and the Senses

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Lisa Goldfarb

Description

In a letter that he wrote to his Cuban correspondent, Jose Rodriguez Feo, Wallace Stevens referred to Marcel Proust as a poet. “It seems like a revelation,” Stevens wrote of Proust, “but it is quite possible to say that that is exactly what he was and perhaps all that he was.” Proust’s masterpiece,  In Search of Lost Time , is often considered for the way it challenged and enlarged the form of the 20th century novel, as well as for the author’s meticulous exploration of the workings of time, history, memory, psychology, and the senses. Yet, it is more unusual to study Proust as a poet, or for his impact on modern poetry. In this course, therefore, we begin our study of the presentation and importance of the senses in modern poetry with Proust (via portions of  In Search of  Lost Time) . Proust will then serve as prelude to our examination of the various ways that modern poets respond to, follow, and reach beyond him in their use and portrayal of the senses (and, by extension, time and memory). Contextual materials may include, among other texts, Bergson’s "Introduction to Metaphysics" and Susan Stewart’s  Modern Poetry and the Fate of the  Senses . Primary readings include portions of Proust’s  In Search of Lost  Time , and poetry and essays of Valéry, Eliot, Pound, Moore, Bishop, Auden, Stevens, and Brooks.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1359 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

American Capitalism in the Twentieth Century

4 units Tue Thu
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Kimberly Phillips-Fein

Description

This course examines the development of capitalism in the United States over the course of the twentieth century, paying special attention to the relationship between the economy and political, cultural and intellectual transformations. It will cover the rise of the modern corporation, the labor movement, the Great Depression and the New Deal, the economic impact of war in the twentieth century, racism and economics, the changing economic position of women, deindustrialization and the stock market boom of the 1990s. The class will focus in particular on the problem of how Americans have confronted and sought to understand hard economic times. In a country whose culture privileges the “American dream” of economic success, how have people dealt with struggle, difficulty and failure? How have financial panics, depressions and recessions, and economic decline affected American political economy and culture? Readings will incorporate both primary and secondary sources. Possible authors include Betty Friedan, John Kenneth Galbraith, Malcolm X and Ronald Reagan.

Notes

Same as HIST-UA 699 002.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

PRACT-UG1550 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Conservation Biology in Practice: Solutions for People and Nature

4 units Thu
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Jim Tolisano

Description

This Gallatin practicum will explore cutting edge strategies being applied by practicing conservation biologists to design solutions to global threats to biological and cultural diversity. The fieldwork carried out by practitioners using the tools from the biological, physical, and social sciences provides the foundation from which nature conservation decisions can proceed. Students will learn how to use the results from these scientific studies to produce applied conservation solutions on the ground. Students will work in teams to select a site-based project from a menu of project options and research the lessons learned from anthropology, social psychology, economics, biology, communications and the arts to generate practical and achievable solutions to these risks and threats.

Notes

Sect 002 for Environmental Studies majors.

Type

Practicum (PRACT-UG)

IDSEM-UG9254 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: Fashion, Culture, and the Body

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON: This is a course that explores the relationship between ideas, the body and the way that fashion can be understood to mediate between the two. Through a range of disciplines and media this course considers the body as an aspect of not only medical and scientific exploration, but crucially as a vital element of culture and society. Bodies affect the ways in which the social world and power relations are organized, and they even arguably condition the way that we understand reality itself. Our physical form is constantly shaped according to both philosophies and fashions. Body ideals and broader ideals often interrelate strongly through bodily practices and with what we wear. There are meanings and fashions in all bodily forms (skinny, buxom, muscular, ideas of ‘whiteness’) and body practices (dieting, hair management, cleansing rituals, plastic surgery and genital cutting). Over the sessions, we will take a conceptual approach to fashion, as a strident condition of modern life, that incorporates politics, science and aesthetics and we will closely read a number of cultural texts against a number of theoretical models. Attitudes towards the body can vary widely according to historical period, and this course will explore how, in different moments, and via different media, we have been preoccupied with the aesthetics of different body zones, with displaying identity (gender, class and ethnicity), and also with power. Different cultural forms (literary, visual, material etc) will provide the focus of our discussions as they all engage with the different ways that we make meaning out of our bodies. Students will be invited to investigate in their written work set texts from class in addition to primary material of their own choice.

Type

Global Programs (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1747 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Global Bioethics

4 units Tue
6:20 PM - 9:00 PM
Allen Keller

Description

According to the philosopher Peter A. Singer, “Global bioethics seeks to identify key ethical problems faced by the world's six billion inhabitants and envisages solutions that transcend national borders and cultures.” In this course, we examine the emerging field of global bioethics, addressing questions such as: What bioethical concerns do the world’s populations share in common? What are the opportunities and challenges to establishing a common moral framework for addressing bioethical concerns worldwide? Are cultural and geographic variations of ethical concerns and means for addressing them inevitable and perhaps appropriate? We will explore the historical context, principles and practices of bioethics and global health, as well as their interrelationships. Other issues that we will discuss in this seminar include the social determinants of health, human rights, research ethics, HIV/AIDS, ethical issues at the end of life, and emergency/disaster relief. Throughout the course we will utilize case studies to compare and contrast bioethical dilemmas locally, nationally and internationally. Students will learn and apply a stepwise approach for conducting ethical analysis. Class activities will include simulated clinical bioethics committees, research ethics review committees as well as policy analysis and recommendations. Course readings will include scholarly articles and chapters from the medical and social science literature such as public health, political science and philosophy. Additionally, we will read from selected works of fiction that can inform and enrich our discussion of global bioethics including Camus’  The Plague  and Conrad’s  The Heart of Darkness .

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG778 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Shadow Cities: Literary Alterity and Urban Underworlds

4 units Mon Wed
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Adrian Versteegh

Description

The city we see is not all there is. Over seven thousand miles of sewers undergird the five boroughs of New York; centuries of occluded catastrophe dictate the architectural fabric of modern London; and in metropolises around the world the labor of an unacknowledged precariat lets us pass through the urban everyday without reflection. This course looks at how these invisible cities are made visible through literature. We’ll grapple with the pathological, the potential, the evanescent, and even the scatological, as we ask how literature maps on to hidden registers of the built environment. Alongside conventional exercises in essay writing, research, and in-class presentations, students can expect to put theory into practice with assignments involving urban exploration, literary fieldwork, and urban audition. Writing requirements will include formal papers responding to readings; an exploration journal linking texts and experiences; construction of a city itinerary (and corresponding reaction to a classmate’s); and a final research project (which can, with permission, incorporate creative elements). Events at the Morbid Anatomy Museum and excursions with the Atlas Obscura collective may be arranged. Readings may include fiction (Daniel Defoe, China Miéville, Neil Gaiman), film ( Undercity ,  Dark Days ), photography (Wayne Barrar), sensation journalism (G.W.M. Reynolds, Eugène Sue, and the files of  The Illustrated Police News ), literary history (David Pike, W.G. Sebald), and social science (Margaret Morton, Robert Neuwirth, Russell and Cheryl Sharman).

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

ELEC-GG2544 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Fiction Inside Out

4 units Fri
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Meera Nair

Description

In this fiction workshop, we will identify and practice the essential technical elements of fiction writing. We will look under the hood, take the back off the clock, peer into the innards, in order to study the formal decisions necessary for effective story-telling. Our inquiry will include point of entry; character and plot; creating meaningful scenes; interiority v/s external action; exposition; the management of time; the position of the narrator; linear v/s modular design; dialogue and its uses; conflict and resolution; image systems and so on. Fun exercises that encourage play, class readings, technique essays and student work will be points of departure for our enquiries into the internal workings of fiction. Readings include among others Sharma, Marcus, Gurganus, Bulawayo, Anam, and essays on the craft of writing by Butler, Hrijbal and Keesey among others.

Notes

Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor (meerav3@gmail.com).

Type

Graduate Electives (ELEC-GG)

IDSEM-UG1870 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
EARLY
SP 2017

Going Baroque: Baroque Theater, from Ambiguity to Hyperbole

4 units Tue Thu
4:55 PM - 6:10 PM
Simon Fortin

Description

Mannered, adorned, elaborate, grand, exaggerated, eccentric, reactionary—these are all qualities often associated with the Baroque aesthetic, a complex artistic movement that swept the European continent from the late sixteenth to the early eighteenth centuries. While the Baroque may accommodate such descriptions, it also refuses the fetters of definitions. In this course, we examine the controversies that animate the use of the term “Baroque”: How did an aesthetic of grandeur come to inform architecture, politics, religion, the visual arts, and specifically for our intent, the theater? How might the Baroque period be considered a living tension between  Ambiguity , a quality we associate more closely with the Renaissance, and  Hyperbole , understood here as excessive dogmatism? We look at texts that embrace, but also denounce, the Baroque aesthetic turn, and we try to understand how this appetite for grandeur, for excess, for unbridled expressivity still mediates the sensibilities of our post-modernity.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1536 Lib Arts
SOC
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Perversion

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Nina Cornyetz

Description

For Sigmund Freud, perversion denoted all sexual deviances from the heterosexual and genital social norm, even as he acknowledged the ubiquity of such perversions. For Jacques Lacan, perversion meant a particular structure of desire, regardless of social norm, and was related to an ethical dimension. For Michel Foucault, who thoroughly rejected Freud’s “repressive hypothesis,” perversion was an effect of modern sexuality. The course will pursue the following questions and more: What is perversion? Is there a “cause” of perversion? Does it lie in the individual or in the epistemological and ideological formulations of a particular historical chronotope? This course will explore Freud, Lacan and Foucault’s three contrasting notions of perversion, alongside some feminist critiques of the psychoanalytic models, in relation to a selection of Japanese fiction and film depicting a variety of perversions. Readings will include: Freud, “Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality”; Deleuze, “Masochism”; Foucault,  History of Sexuality Vol.  I ; Kawabata,  The House of the Sleeping Beauties ; Tanizaki, Naomi; Kono, “Toddler Hunting." Films will include "Patriotism" and "Happiness."

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

FIRST-UG782 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: The American Welfare State

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Jacob Remes

Description

How has American society defined and dealt with poverty? Should "the poor" be forced to work, be objects of pity, have the right to basic necessities? And what does it mean to designate a human beings as "poor" in the first place? Americans have debated these questions for generations, and indeed debates about welfare policy remain central to contemporary politics. Our answers implicate not only our society's treatment of those who live below the poverty line, but broader questions of American identity and of the government’s role in the lives of citizens. In this research seminar, we will examine the history of social welfare and government benefits in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Chronologically, we will devote half the term to the second half of the 20th century, and we will learn about the development of the peculiarly American private welfare system and the welfare rights movement. We will pay special attention to the positions and subjectivities of reformers, bureaucrats, social workers, and aid recipients. In other words, we will ask how reformers, social workers, and welfare recipients have related to each other, how their relative positions in society have influenced how they have acted, and what the power relationships have been among them. We will read books by Michael Katz and Annelise Orleck. Students will write their own histories of welfare, using archival documents and secondary sources.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

FIRST-UG783 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

First-Year Research Seminar: Money and the Muse: Culture, Creativity, and Capitalism

4 units Mon Wed
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Trevor Laurence Jockims

Description

This course is focused on the interactions between culture, creativity, and capitalism in America over the last fifty years, though we will place this relationship within a wider historical and theoretical context. Beginning with the patronage system that made the Renaissance possible, extending all the way up to crowd sourcing today, our analysis will track the aesthetic and cultural impact money has had over the arts. Our aim is to understand money and its metaphors within artistic, philosophic, and cultural spheres. We will investigate not only how the means of production have changed over the last fifty years, with special emphasis on the movement toward individual producer-consumers, but also, crucially, we will examine works of art and literature that take money as an object of thought and investigation. This element—the examination of works overtly about money and its meanings—will make up a substantial element of the course, and will service as the grounds where our more theoretical investigations become concretized. Conceptual artists and writers will receive particular attention, including Justine Smith’s money-sculptures, Mark Wagner’s currency-collages, Lyn Hejinian’s  My Life in the Nineties,  Charles Bernstein’s  My/My/My , and Matthew Timmons’s  Credit.  We will also consider Andy Warhol’s Factory model, Don Delillo’s  Cosmopolis,  and Fyodor Doestoevsky’s  Crime and Punishment.  Zlavoj Zizek, Theodor Adorno, Bernard Steigler and other theorists will provide organizing principles and a working language for our investigations.

Notes

Open to Gallatin first-year students only.

Type

First-Year Program: Research Seminars (FIRST-UG)

INDIV-UG9100 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

BERLIN: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-BERLIN. This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 12 -15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by Cultural Vistas, an organization partnering with NYU. Cultural Vistas provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

INDIV-UG9300 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

MADRID: Internship Seminar and Fieldwork

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-MADRID. Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Visit the What's Next blog for admitted students for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

Type

Global Programs (INDIV-UG)

ARTS-UG1316 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Playing Jazz

4 units Tue
3:30 PM - 6:10 PM
Bill Rayner

Description

This workshop is designed for student musicians with the knowledge and skills of basic musicianship who want to learn to play jazz or extend their present ability to play jazz. Students learn the fundamentals of improvisation: scale and chord structures, modes, chord progressions, rhythmic applications, song forms and options for organizing an improvisation such as creating a melody out of melodic fragments, scale fragments, and sequences. We listen to great jazz performers to hear examples of good improvisation, proper phrasing and jazz styles. Students attending the workshop gain a working musical vocabulary in the language of mainstream jazz. This workshop offers students a solid starting point, whether they want to play professionally, for personal enjoyment or simply to broaden their knowledge of what it takes to play jazz.

Notes

Lab fee: $35. Course meets at Drummer's Collective, 541 Sixth Avenue.

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

IDSEM-UG1590 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Walter Benjamin: Theory for Gleaners

4 units Wed
12:30 PM - 3:15 PM
A.B. Huber

Description

Long before the advent of green politics, and before recycling and repurposing became fashionable, there were people surviving with little fanfare on discards, and theorists meditating on the revolutionary possibilities of refuse and junk. This seminar introduces students to the work of Walter Benjamin, who is both a central figure in critical theory and an early, powerful commentator on the politics and aesthetics of trash. We begin with Agnès Varda’s film The Gleaners and I, and explore the relation between theory and the recycling of ideas, images, and objects, especially those that have been overlooked or abandoned. As a refugee himself, Benjamin knew intimately how whole populations can be dispossessed or cast off. Following his thought, we ask what displaced subjects and discarded objects might teach us about the larger economies of capitalism, modernity and the city, but also about human desire, need and frailty. Our primary text is Benjamin's expansive and unfinished work of citations and brief commentaries, The Arcades Project (1927-1940), but we will read Freud, Marx, and the Frankfurt School to contextualize the work historically and theoretically. What did Benjamin make of dross, and what can we glean from his thought for our own times?

Notes

Same as COLIT-UA.866.001

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

IDSEM-UG1535 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
GLOBAL
SP 2017

Narrating Memory, History and Place

4 units Tue Thu
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Marie Cruz Soto

Description

This course examines how people imagine a place of their own through narrations of the past. The past, after all, is a contested terrain open to divergent interpretations that shape common understandings of places. The meanings bestowed on places dictate who can use them, and how. Thus, the ways through which people narrate the past can transform places. This course, therefore, explores the broad interplay between narrations of memory, history and place. It focuses, however, on the politics of historical narrations in struggles of disempowered communities to claim a place of their own. Course readings include literary and other scholarly texts like Jamaica Kincaid’s  A Small Place , Michel-Rolph Trouillot’s  Silencing the Past  and Michel De Certeau’s  The Practice of Everyday Life  as well as writings by Edward Said, William Cronon, Diana Taylor, Steven Hoelscher and Doreen Massey.

Notes

Same as SCA-UA 721 007.

Type

Interdisciplinary Seminars (IDSEM-UG)

ARTS-UG1011 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Voicing the Text

4 units Fri
9:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Jessie Austrian

Description

In this class we study vocal and performance technique, as well as the art of rhetoric and persuasive communication. We will put these two studies together to practice and investigate how to communicate thought and evoke pathos, understanding and action from our audiences. Students will discuss, analyze and perform texts from classic and modern plays and poetry, as well as ancient and contemporary political texts. This course will ask questions such as: What is the difference between texts that are intended to be heard versus texts that are intended to be read? How do the musical qualities of the voice (such as tone, timbre and inflection) affect the content and reception of the message? How does a performer give voice to a playwright's words? How do our vocal habits affect our ability to communicate clearly? How can we each use our natural voice to its best and most profound effect?

Type

Arts Workshops (ARTS-UG)

PRACT-UG1801 Lib Arts
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

Global Fellowship in Urban Practice: Methodologies

2 units Wed
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Max Holleran

Description

It is not necessary to imagine what an unjust city looks like. Examples cover the globe. And it is easy to simply imagine a utopian alternative. More exciting and challenging are combining knowledge, vision, and actions that would yield more just cities in the early 21st century. In this methodologies course, we will focus on how to do participatory observation research on urban justice projects in Berlin, Madrid, Buenos Aires, and New York. This requires refining our thinking about urban justice in the global city—but even more importantly, developing concrete research methods that will help you track everyday political practices in real time, while keeping your focus on broad, general questions animated by cutting-edge conceptual reflection. We will first reflect on the broad research questions that should animate our work. Then, we will learn ethnographic and interview techniques that will you will test out in a mini-ethnographic project. Finally, reflecting on our brief encounter with practice, we will develop a research design to prepare for your summer fellowship research. Readings for this course will include Neil Brenner’s “Theses on Urbanization,” David Harvey’s “The Right to the City,” Ananya Roy’s “The 21st Century Metropolis: New Geographies of Theory,” Pierre Bourdieu’s “Understanding” and Robert Emerson, et al.  Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes .

Notes

Permission required. Open to Gallatin Global Fellows in Urban Practice. Students who are not fellows may register only with permission from Rebecca Amato (becky.amato@nyu.edu).

Type

Practicum (PRACT-UG)

IDSEM-UG9252 Lib Arts
HUM
Hist & Cult
SP 2017

LONDON: History of British Fashion

4 units

Description

THIS COURSE TAKES PLACE AT NYU-LONDON: This interdisciplinary seminar serves as a broad overview for several centuries of British male and female fashion trends, from roughly the Tudor period to today. The course focuses on ways that modes and standards of dress evolved in response to political, economic and technological developments; empire and immigration; changing gender and class formations; and the vagaries of popular culture. In short, the course examines not only what people wore at different historical moments, but why they wore what they did, and how they felt about it. Readings come from the fields of literature, history, art